About: Louis Marchesano

I'm curator of prints and drawings at the Getty Research Institute.

Posts by Louis

Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings

Louis XIV’s Golden Dome

Facade of the Church of the Invalides / Pierre Lepautre after Jules Hardouin-Mansart
Facade of the Church of the Invalides, 1687, Pierre Lepautre after Jules Hardouin-Mansart. Etching and engraving from a bound volume of 14 prints (Bâtiments du roi, Paris, 1687). The Getty Research Institute, 1392-604

A rare print for the dome of the Invalides in Paris reflects Louis XIV’s ambitions to make Paris “a new European center of architectural magnificence.” More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings, Research

“The Everlasting Cycle of Becoming and Fading”: Thomas W. Gaehtgens on Philipp Otto Runge’s “Times of Day”

Detail of Night from the Times of Day suite / Philipp Otto Runge

“Runge’s prints represent far more than merely the times of day. The cycle of the day represents in fact the cycle of life.” More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings

Philipp Otto Runge’s “Times of Day,” A Monument of German Romantic Art

Detail of the female figure in Evening from the Times of Day suite / Philipp Otto Runge

This remarkable four-print series depicts the coming and departing of light, which points to the cycles of life from conception to death. More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute, Research

Recovering Lost History in Le Brun’s Prints

Crossing of the Granicus, Gérard Audran after Charles Le Brun, 1672. The Getty Research Institute, 2003.PR.33

In 2003 the Getty Research Institute acquired hundreds of 17th-century French prints that had been in the collection of a European noble family. This family had systematically, over hundreds of years, amassed an incredibly important collection of Old Master prints,… More»

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      Presidential Death Beds & Independence Day

      Here’s a little history trivia about this special day

      John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, Founding Fathers and the second and third Presidents of the United States, both died on July 4, 1826, on the 50th anniversary of Independence Day. 

      Because of their opposing views on politics as well as their contrasting personalities, the two men were not on friendly terms, and rumor has it that Adams’ last words on his deathbed were “Jefferson survives.” Little did he know that Jefferson had actually died five hours earlier.

      Leaving you with that conversation starter, we hope you celebrate this day with friends and family and feast like the Romans!

      07/04/15

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