About: Meredith L. Clausen

I’m professor of architectural history at the University of Washington and the organizer of a recent session on Ada Louise Huxtable at the Society of Architectural Historians’ annual conference. My research spans 19th- and 20th-century architecture, particularly in postwar U.S. and fin-de-siècle Paris, and is currently focused on Le Corbusier's early years in Paris. My past books and articles have focused on the Pan Am Building, Art Nouveau theory, and women in architecture, among other topics; an article on Michael Graves's Portland Building, power plays, and postmodernism will be out in June 2014 in the Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians.

Posts by Meredith

Posted in Architecture and Design, Art & Archives, Getty Research Institute, Scholarship

The Fiery Career of Architecture Critic Ada Louise Huxtable

Ada Louise Huxtable with Richard Meier in 1996
Photo: Vladimir Lange

“I wanted her attention, but I was scared of it…She was tough, but her words were beautiful.” More»

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      Clocking in at a giant 400 square feet, this tapestry, Triumph of Bacchus, teems with tiny details and hidden narratives.

      Here are just three:

      • At bottom center, Bacchus poses on the world’s largest wine fountain.
      • To the left, a sad, Eeyore-like donkey waits for satyrs and men to unload grapes from his back.
      • To the right, a rowdy monkey rides a camel that carries wooden barrels—presumably to be filled with wine.

      The tapestry is one of the highlights of the exhibition Woven Gold: Tapestries of Louis XIV. (L.A. folks: final weekend!)

      More on The Iris: A Tour of the Triumph of Bacchus

      Triumph of Bacchus (overall view and details), about 1560, design by Giovanni da Udine under the supervision of Raphael; woven at the workshop of Frans Geubels, Brussels. Wool, silk, and gilt metal-wrapped thread. Courtesy of Le Mobilier National. Image © Le Mobilier National. Photo by Lawrence Perquis

      04/29/16

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