About: Marlyn Musicant

I'm the exhibitions coordinator at the Getty Research Institute. I earned my M.A. in the History of Decorative Arts, Design and Culture at the Bard Graduate Center, New York. Prior to joining the GRI, I organized the installation of the permanent collection of British and European art at the Huntington (2004–2008) and produced interpretive content for the J. Paul Getty Museum (2000–2004). I've taught the history of the built environment at UCLA and given lectures on 18th-century British art. My past research has focused on the history of textiles and the interior in the 20th century, and my current research focuses on 20th-century industrial design and architecture, particularly the work of German émigré Karl Schneider (1892–1945), whose archive resides at the GRI.

Posts by Marlyn

Posted in Architecture and Design, Art, Getty Research Institute

Sears: Can an American Institution Return to Its Design Roots?

Design for Drip Coffee Maker / Karl Schneider

Some time ago, I saw a headline in the Wall Street Journal that read “In Retreat, Sears Set to Unload Stores.” It seems that Sears is cash strapped and needs to raise over $700 million, so selling its stores is… More»

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Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute

Think Local, Exhibit Global—Research Institute Exhibitions on the Move

Installation view of Art, Anti-Art, Non-Art: Experimentations in the Public Sphere in Postwar Japan, 1950-1970 at the University of Michigan Museum of Art. Photo: Randy Stegmeyer

Off the tram, up the stairs and take a sharp right before going into the main entrance pavilion. Head into the building across from the Cafe. That’s where you’ll usually find the distinctive exhibitions of the Getty Research Institute (GRI)…. More»

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      #ThyCaptionBe: Don’t Be So Crabby

      You captioned this detail. And we’re revealing the full story now.

      Jaws reference or some rather nasty surf and turf? It’s actually a depiction of the astrological symbol for Cancer.

      Here’s the full story:

      This peasant might be tired from working in the hot sun, but this is no time to go for a swim to cool off! 

      We all know there’s a risk of encountering creepy crawlers when out gardening, but that giant sinister lobster lurking in the water is actually a crab – the astrological symbol for Cancer. 

      Medieval prayer books often include a yearly calendar at the beginning of the text listing important feast days. Each month is usually accompanied by illuminations of seasonal activities and zodiacal signs, such as this one for the month of June.

      #ThyCaptionBe is a celebration of modern interpretations of medieval aesthetics. You guess what the heck is going on, then we myth-bust.


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