About: Nina Diamond

I’m a writer/editor in the Collections Information & Access Department at the J. Paul Getty Museum. I write in-gallery and online media such as videos, interactives, and audio guides on all manner of topics. Would you believe a wooden saint with prosthetic glass eyeballs, a beheaded Aztec god, or a talking German rabbit? (BTW: Everybody can play with the stuff we make, not just the popular kids.)

Posts by Nina

Posted in Ancient World, Gardens and Architecture, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum

New Audio Tour Celebrates the Getty Villa’s 40th Anniversary

Doorway to the Outer Peristyle of the Getty Villa / reception area

Did you know Romans kept eels as pets and bought them…jewelry? Come stroll the grounds of this 40-year-young institution to hear that story and a few others besides. More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

How Herb Ritts Created an Icon

Versace Dress, Back View, El Mirage / Herb Ritts

When Herb Ritts created this image, it was touch-and-go whether he would get his crew and model off the El Mirage lake bed before a storm swept through. Mark McKenna, now executive director of the Herb Ritts Foundation, was Ritts’s… More»

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Posted in Antiquities, Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

The Italian Showcase

Portrait of a Halberdier (Francesco Guardi?), Pontormo, 1528–30. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 89.PA.49

If our globe had a school playground, could you spot Italy? That’s right, the one voted “most popular.” Good-looking, sharp, charismatic. Plus, a rock star in art class. This year, the popular kid turns 150. Surprisingly, the nation that for… More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes

Why? Because the Pig in the Painting Said So!

Me, giving a sculpture a gorilla hug in the 1970s

As a kid I was sure if I could be alone with works or art, in or out of museums—ditch the parents, teachers, and guards—that the works of art would talk to me. I assessed hiding places, considered alarm systems…. More»

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      Olympian Census #4: Aphrodite

      Get the stats on your favorite (and not-so-favorite) gods and goddesses on view at the Getty Center.

      Roman name: Venus

      Employment: Goddess of Love and Beauty

      Place of residence: Mount Olympus

      Parents: Born out of sea foam formed when Uranus’s castrated genitals were thrown into the ocean

      Marital status: Married to Hephaestus, the God of Blacksmiths, but had many lovers, both immortal and mortal

      Offspring: Aeneas, Cupid, Eros, Harmonia, Hermaphroditos, and more

      Symbol: Dove, swan, and roses

      Special talent: Being beautiful and sexy could never have been easier for this Greek goddess

      Highlights reel:

      • Zeus knew she was trouble when she walked in (Sorry, Taylor Swift) to Mount Olympus for the first time. So Zeus married Aphrodite to his son Hephaestus (Vulcan), forming the perfect “Beauty and the Beast” couple.
      • When Aphrodite and Persephone, the queen of the underworld, both fell in love with the beautiful mortal boy Adonis, Zeus gave Adonis the choice to live with one goddess for 1/3 of the year and the other for 2/3. Adonis chose to live with Aphrodite longer, only to die young.
      • Aphrodite offered Helen, the most beautiful mortal woman, to Paris, a Trojan prince, to win the Golden Apple from him over Hera and Athena. She just conveniently forgot the fact that Helen was already married. Oops. Hello, Trojan War!

      Olympian Census is a 12-part series profiling gods in art at the Getty Center.

      08/03/15

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