About: Nigel McGilchrist

I’ve lived and worked in Italy, Greece, and Turkey for almost 30 years. An art historian by training, I’ve served as director of the Anglo-Italian Institute in Rome, taught at the University of Rome, and been dean of European Studies for Rhodes College and the University of the South at Sewanee, Tennessee. I’m also on the board of editors of the Blue Guides series and have contributed to several new editions on Italy. Over the last seven years I’ve walked every path and village of the inhabited Greek Islands for the new Blue Guide of its archaeology, history, and ecology, which was released in September 2010 and named one of the best books of the year by The Economist. I live near Orvieto, Italy, where I produce my own olive oil and red wine.

Posts by Nigel

Posted in Antiquities, J. Paul Getty Museum

My Odyssey through the Aegean Islands

Paros marble, Milos Obsidian, and Naxos emery

Art historian and archaeologist Nigel McGilchrist is taking us to the Aegean—and you can come along! On January 13, he’ll give a free illustrated talk at the Getty Villa on his nearly seven years exploring seventy of these beautiful islands,… More»

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      From you have I been absent in the spring,
      When proud-pied April, dressed in all his trim,
      Hath put a spirit of youth in everything,
      That heavy Saturn laughed and leaped with him,
      Yet nor the lays of birds, nor the sweet smell
      Of different flowers in odor and in hue,
      Could make me any summer’s story tell,
      Or from their proud lap pluck them where they grew.
      Nor did I wonder at the lily’s white,
      Nor praise the deep vermilion in the rose;
      They were but sweet, but figures of delight,
      Drawn after you, you pattern of all those.
      Yet seemed it winter still, and, you away,
      As with your shadow I with these did play.

      —William Shakespeare, born April 23, 1564

      Vase of Flowers (detail), 1722, Jan van Huysum. The J. Paul Getty Museum

      04/23/14

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