About: Qingnian Tang

唐慶年一九五六年生於北京。一九八四年畢業於中央工藝美術學院。曾為中國的美術雜誌《美術》編輯部副主任,美術評論家。八十年代中期中國新潮美術剛剛露出端倪,他就是最早的推動者。一九八九年北京行的中國現代藝術展,他是組織委員會成員和展覽組織者之一。一九九一年移居美國後,繼續從事他的藝術實踐。現在在南加州最大的亞裔廣告公司之一擔任藝術顧問。 Qingnian Tang was born in 1956 in Beijing, where he graduated from the Central Academy of Art and Design before serving as art critic and vice director of the editorial department for the art magazine Meishu (Art Monthly). Among the first artists to promote China’s seminal “New Wave” art movement in the mid-1980s, Tang was a primary exhibition coordinator for the 1989 China/Avant-garde exhibition held in Beijing. In 1991 he moved to the United States, where he has continued his art practice. He currently works as an artistic advisor at one of the largest Asian American advertising agencies in Southern California.

Posts by Qingnian

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute

Writing Verse for “Brush & Shutter”

Diulian at the entrance to the GRI exhibition Brush & Shutter

Greeting you at the entrance to Brush & Shutter: Early Photography in China is a duilian, two lines of Chinese poetry that situate the exhibition. The author of that duilian here describes the process of its creation, which was spurred… More»

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      All Hail Tiberius, Least Media-Savvy of the Roman Emperors

      Tiberius was proclaimed Roman emperor on September 17 in AD 14, exactly 2,000 years ago.

      He was also a bit wacko. “He was the least media-savvy emperor you could imagine,” says curator David Saunders, who has been in charge of this bronze portrait of Tiberius which leaves us on September 22. He point to this description found in the writings of Cassius Dio:

      Tiberius was a patrician of good education, but he had a most peculiar nature. He never let what he desired appear in his conversation, and what he said he wanted he usually did not desire at all. On the contrary, his words indicated the exact opposite of his real purpose; he denied all interest in what he longed for, and urged the claims of what he hated. He would exhibit anger over matters that were far from arousing his wrath, and make a show of affability where he was most vexed…In short, he thought it bad policy for the sovereign to reveal his thoughts; this was often the cause, he said, of great failures, whereas by the opposite course, far more and greater successes were attained.

      Moreover, David tells us, “Tiberius’s accession itself was a farrago: Tiberius sort-of feigning reluctance, the Senate bullying him, he being all, ‘Well, if-I-have-to,’ and in the end—according to Suetonius—saying he’ll do it as long as he can retire.”

      Suetonius is full of great, albeit spurious, anecdotes about poor old Tiberius, David reports. “When someone addressed him as ‘My Lord,’ it is said, Tiberius gave warning that no such insult should ever again be thrown at him.”

      Happy accession, My Lord!

      Portrait Head of Tiberius (“The Lansdowne Tiberius”), early 1st century A.D., Roman. The J. Paul Getty Museum

      Statue of Tiberius (detail), Roman, A.D. 37, Soprintendenza Speciale per i Beni Archeologici di Napoli e Pompei – Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli, Laboratorio di Conservazione e Restauro. Currently on view at the Getty Villa following conservation and study.

      09/17/14

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