About: Rebecca Taylor

I'm a senior communications specialist at the J. Paul Getty Trust, which means I talk about art for a living with just about anyone who will listen (curators, the press, our Facebook fans, etc.). Since I joined the Getty three years ago, I've had several serious relationships with highly respectable men—Bernini, Rembrandt, Leonardo, and Donatello—but have unintentionally neglected the other ninja turtles, Raphael and Michelangelo. Perhaps in 2011!

Posts by Rebecca

Posted in Art, Prints and Drawings

Honoré Daumier: Still Relevant after 150 Years

The French judicial system on trial: A Criminal Case, Honoré Daumier, 1865. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 89.GA.33

Years ago I found myself in the Metropolitan Museum of Art with a posse of 15 finance geeks in tow, enjoying respite from a college trip to study financial institutions on Wall Street. Being the only art nerd amongst the… More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

Manet of Mystery (and Melancholy)

The Rue Mosnier with Flags / Edouard Manet

My love affair with Édouard Manet, who was born on this day in 1832, is now decades in the making—dating back to my very first high school art history course, when the teacher showed a slide of the artist’s 1863… More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

Beyond the First Impression: Rediscovering Monet in Paris

The Portal of Rouen Cathedral in Morning Light, Claude Monet, 1894
The Portal of Rouen Cathedral in Morning Light, Claude Monet, 1894

Though his name has become synonymous with the 19th century’s canonical movement of Impressionism, and though his masterpieces hang proudly in the halls of the world’s finest museums, Claude Monet has long been—for me—a confounding artist. He was one of… More»

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Posted in Art, Paintings

In Need of a Géricault “Fix”

Portrait Study for The Raft of the Medusa, Théodore Géricault, 1818–19

Even though it’s been more than a decade, I remember it as though it were yesterday. Like so many art history students, I made my first pilgrimage to the Louvre—tantamount to mecca for an art nerd like me—to feast my… More»

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Posted in Getty Research Institute, Photographs, Film, and Video

Boring Art? Bring It.

I Will Not Talk in Class

Expensive, large, and burdensome to travel with, the camcorders I was first exposed to served only one purpose: to painstakingly document every birthday party, dance recital, and performance of Shakespearean soliloquies on the stage (ahem, fireplace) of my childhood. It… More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Center, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

85 Years After John Singer Sargent

Portrait of Therese, countess Clary Aldringen / Sargent
Portrait of Therese, countess Clary Aldringen / Sargent

During the late 19th century, John Singer Sargent (1856–1925) was the most fashionable portrait painter in England and the United States. An example of his iconic style, his Portrait of Thérése, countess Clary Aldringen (1896) is now on view at… More»

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