About: Villa Teen Apprentices

The Villa Teen Apprentices (ViTAs) are high school students who spend seven months learning behind the scenes about what it's like to work in a museum. They meet staff from many departments, do creative projects, and learn about works of art. Their final project is to present the art of the ancient world from their unique perspective—this year, through Getty Voices. The Villa Teen Apprentices for 2012–13 are: Danielle Bui, Gaby Chitwood, Alexandra Cogbill, Kailyn Flowers, McKenzie Givens, Sebastian Hart, Kate Hinrichs, Jackie Ibragimov, Jenny Lee, Pilar Marin, Mattias Rosenberg, and Sara Rygiel.

Posts by Villa Teen Apprentices

Posted in Ancient World, Antiquities, Voices

Seduction in Ancient Rome

Roman fresco with banquet scene from the Casa dei Casti Amanti, Marisa Ranieri Panetta (ed.): Pompeji. Geschichte, Kunst und Leben in der versunkenen Stadt. Belser, Stuttgart 2005, author: Wolfgang Rieger
Roman fresco with banquet scene from the Casa dei Casti Amanti, Marisa Ranieri Panetta (ed.): Pompeji. Geschichte, Kunst und Leben in der versunkenen Stadt. Belser, Stuttgart 2005, author: Wolfgang Rieger

Ovid’s Ars Amatoria serves up the rules of ancient Roman dating and sex—some hilarious, some mildly horrifying. More»

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Posted in Ancient World, Antiquities, Getty Villa, Voices

Getty Voices: Classics 2.0

pompeii_graffiti_featured

The real ancient world of Greece and Rome was much like our own: colorful, human, and messy. The Villa Teen Apprentices take it on. More»

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      Banned Books Week—History Edition

      Giordano Bruno revealed ancient secrets of improving memory by writing about the method of loci, also known as the memory palace.

      This technique is still used today as a way to memorize vast amounts of information. By “putting away” information into the drawers and rooms of a familiar place in your mind, you can access this info later by mentally “opening” the right drawer. 

      Unfortunately, this idea was not accepted during the Roman Inquisition. Bruno was burned at the stake in 1600 and his book was on the Vatican Index of Prohibited Books.

      Enjoy a completely digitized copy: De umbris idearum, 1582, Bruno Giordano. The Getty Research Institute

      Banned Books Week celebrates the freedom to read. This week we’re sharing examples of books from cultural history that have been attacked, vilified, or otherwise banned.

      09/24/14

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