Ancient World, Behind the Scenes, Getty Villa

Five-Ton Wheel Takes Center Stage for “Prometheus Bound”

It looks like a ferris wheel—but you can’t ride on it, and instead of pleasure, it offers endless torment. The Prometheus Wheel has arrived.

The 23-foot-tall, five-ton steel creation is the centerpiece of this fall’s outdoor theater production of Prometheus Bound, where it represents the mountaintop to which the rebel god Prometheus is chained for all eternity in punishment for his defiance of Zeus. The actor who plays Prometheus, Ron Cephas Jones, will perform while strapped to the rotating center of the wheel, perched on a modified bike seat.

The wheel is the brainchild of the creative team at the CalArts Center for the Art of Performance, the Getty’s partner in this production. “They have the expertise, the ambition, and the artistic sense to pull off something like this,” Laurel Kishi, performing arts manager at the Getty Museum, told me as we watched the wheel crane over the Villa.

Visitors will be able to see the wheel (but not touch, spin, or climb on it—seriously, no climbing!) in the Outdoor Classical Theater every day through the end of September, when the production concludes. “We felt this would be a great piece to have up so that, even when the play isn’t happening, visitors can take a look at it,” Laurel said. If the wheel moves you, tag it with #PrometheusWheel on Instagram and Twitter.

Video by Sarah Waldorf and Steve Saldivar

Tagged , , , , , , , Bookmark the permalink. Post a comment or leave a trackback: Trackback URL.

Post a Comment

Your email is never published or shared. Required fields are marked *

*
*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

  • Facebook

  • Twitter

  • Tumblr

    • photo from Tumblr

      Presidential Death Beds & Independence Day

      Here’s a little history trivia about this special day

      John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, Founding Fathers and the second and third Presidents of the United States, both died on July 4, 1826, on the 50th anniversary of Independence Day. 

      Because of their opposing views on politics as well as their contrasting personalities, the two men were not on friendly terms, and rumor has it that Adams’ last words on his deathbed were “Jefferson survives.” Little did he know that Jefferson had actually died five hours earlier.

      Leaving you with that conversation starter, we hope you celebrate this day with friends and family and feast like the Romans!

      07/04/15

  • Flickr