Behind the Scenes, Gardens and Architecture, Getty Villa, Photographs, Film, and Video, Voices

The Transformative Outer Peristyle

“I think there is something magical about shooting in natural light.” This week on Getty Voices, Tahnee Cracchiola shares her photographic encounters with wildlife on site at the Getty. Her first photographic love was architecture photography. Her journey shooting the Outer Peristyle led to some breathtaking architecture images at sunrise and sunset, as well as a  surprising visit from a new feathered friend!


During visiting hours the Getty Villa’s Outer Peristyle is bright, green and rich with sunshine. But it doesn’t always look so saturated with color. Sunrise and sunset are ideal times to shoot landscape and architecture to get the golds and oranges of the sun rising through the atmosphere, or the pink and purple hues of the sun setting. Even the most subtle shifts in light quality can change an image dramatically.

Sunrise over the Outer Peristyle

Sunset over the Outer Peristyle


The Outer Peristyle may appear quiet and calm in these photographs. I didn’t think anything more than insects and the occasional hummingbird visited the gardens, but on one early morning I was photographing the sycamore trees when a duck landed on the side of the reflecting pool! He was like a hotel visitor lounging by the hottub…swimming, drinking, perhaps waiting for his mate. The gardeners told me that he came here at the same time every morning with his mate. But she never came. It’s a mystery that remains unsolved.

Perhaps it was a tragic love story amidst the art and the gardens that we’ll never hear the ending of. We do know that this little guy is welcome to the Getty any day of the week.

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      Banned Books Week—History Edition

      Giordano Bruno revealed ancient secrets of improving memory by writing about the method of loci, also known as the memory palace.

      This technique is still used today as a way to memorize vast amounts of information. By “putting away” information into the drawers and rooms of a familiar place in your mind, you can access this info later by mentally “opening” the right drawer. 

      Unfortunately, this idea was not accepted during the Roman Inquisition. Bruno was burned at the stake in 1600 and his book was on the Vatican Index of Prohibited Books.

      Enjoy a completely digitized copy: De umbris idearum, 1582, Bruno Giordano. The Getty Research Institute

      Banned Books Week celebrates the freedom to read. This week we’re sharing examples of books from cultural history that have been attacked, vilified, or otherwise banned.

      09/24/14

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