Art, Education, J. Paul Getty Museum

Getty Museum and Khan Academy Partner in Online Learning

More than 80 videos now featured; new collaborative learning resources to come

Getty Museum's educational videos on Khan Academy's website

Getty Museum’s educational videos on Khan Academy’s website

The Getty Museum offers a treasure trove of educational videos about art history and art-making. Our YouTube channel features topics ranging from the mummification process (in all its gory glory) to the making of intricate and colorful medieval manuscripts. I’m happy to announce that dozens of these videos will now be featured by the Khan Academy, a non-profit that seeks to provide free world-class education to anyone, anywhere.

As a first step, today more than 80 videos, created primarily by the Museum’s Collection Information and Access department, have been released on Khan Academy’s website. Moving forward, we will work with Khan Academy’s art historians, Dr. Beth Harris and Dr. Steven Zucker, to create new videos, critical-thinking exercises, and quizzes.

Khan Academy has an impressive collection of tutorials, articles, discussions, and videos that cover art from ancient times to the present. The Museum has a particular strength in interpretive videos on techniques and materials unique to our collection, such as Greek vase-making and glass-blowing—as well as playful slants on art perfect for kids (check out the lessons from a blue gangster demon).

Sharing these videos with Khan Academy’s users is in step with the mission of the Getty Museum’s Education Department to make its award-winning programming and resources available to as many audiences as possible, both on-site and online. These include free online curricula and interactive activities, tours, workshops, webinars, lectures, performances and a robust program of school visits. In the last year alone, more than 135,000 students visited the Getty’s two locations.

We’re looking forward to a fruitful and creative partnership with the Khan Academy for years to come.

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  • [...] “The Getty Museum offers a treasure trove of educational videos about art history and art-making. Our YouTube channel features topics ranging from the mummification process (in all its gory glory) to the making of intricate and colorful medieval manuscripts. I’m happy to announce that dozens of these videos will now be featured by the Khan Academy, a non-profit that seeks to provide free world-class education to anyone, anywhere. As a first step, today more than 80 videos, created primarily by the Museum’s Collection Information and Access department, have been released on Khan Academy’s website. Moving forward, we will work with Khan Academy’s art historians, Dr. Beth Harris and Dr. Steven Zucker, to create new videos, critical-thinking exercises, and quizzes.” (via The Getty Iris) [...]

  • By Links we like – Apps On Tap on November 12, 2013 at 11:54 am

    [...] Getty Museum has paired up with Khan Academy to offer collaborative learning possibilities for art history and art-making. Fine Arts majors and non-Fine Arts majors alike, rejoice!     [...]

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      All Hail Tiberius, Least Media-Savvy of the Roman Emperors

      Tiberius was proclaimed Roman emperor on September 17 in AD 14, exactly 2,000 years ago.

      He was also a bit wacko. “He was the least media-savvy emperor you could imagine,” says curator David Saunders, who has been in charge of this bronze portrait of Tiberius which leaves us on September 22. He point to this description found in the writings of Cassius Dio:

      Tiberius was a patrician of good education, but he had a most peculiar nature. He never let what he desired appear in his conversation, and what he said he wanted he usually did not desire at all. On the contrary, his words indicated the exact opposite of his real purpose; he denied all interest in what he longed for, and urged the claims of what he hated. He would exhibit anger over matters that were far from arousing his wrath, and make a show of affability where he was most vexed…In short, he thought it bad policy for the sovereign to reveal his thoughts; this was often the cause, he said, of great failures, whereas by the opposite course, far more and greater successes were attained.

      Moreover, David tells us, “Tiberius’s accession itself was a farrago: Tiberius sort-of feigning reluctance, the Senate bullying him, he being all, ‘Well, if-I-have-to,’ and in the end—according to Suetonius—saying he’ll do it as long as he can retire.”

      Suetonius is full of great, albeit spurious, anecdotes about poor old Tiberius, David reports. “When someone addressed him as ‘My Lord,’ it is said, Tiberius gave warning that no such insult should ever again be thrown at him.”

      Happy accession, My Lord!

      Portrait Head of Tiberius (“The Lansdowne Tiberius”), early 1st century A.D., Roman. The J. Paul Getty Museum

      Statue of Tiberius (detail), Roman, A.D. 37, Soprintendenza Speciale per i Beni Archeologici di Napoli e Pompei – Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli, Laboratorio di Conservazione e Restauro. Currently on view at the Getty Villa following conservation and study.

      09/17/14

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