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Posted in Ancient World, Antiquities, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum

Power in a Mummy Portrait

Mummy Portrait of Isidora / Isidora Master
Mummy Portrait of a Woman (detail), about A.D. 100–110, attributed to the Isidora Master. Linen, pigment, and gold; encaustic on wood, 18 7/8 x 14 3/16. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 81.AP.42

This woman is still beautiful and self-assured, 2,000 years after her portrait was painted. More»

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Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

Who Was James Ensor?

The Skeleton Painter / James Ensor
Royal Museum of Fine Arts Antwerp. © 2014 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / SABAM, Brussels. Image © Lukas-Art in Flanders vzw, photo Hugo Maertens

Belgium’s most eccentric, scandalous, and shocking painter is the focus of an exhibition at the Getty Center this summer. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Paintings

Three Cameras, One Painting—Pollock’s “Mural” on Video

Laptop with Jackson Pollock's Mural
Behind the scenes during production of videos about Jackson Pollock’s Mural. Painted 1943, oil and casein on canvas, 95 5/8 x 237 3/4 in. The University of Iowa Museum of Art, Gift of Peggy Guggenheim, 1959.6. Reproduced with permission from The University of Iowa

Midcentury painting inspires 21st-century video. More»

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Posted in Art, Photographs, Film, and Video

Does Art Belong on a City Bus?

Out the Window / Ann Kameko
Photo courtesy of Ann Kameko

An artist creates an urban opera set inside a bus, with joyful movement as the plot. More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Photographs, Film, and Video

This Exhibition Is a Total Trip—Through Time

ATRIPTHROUGHTIME

Going to the museum means traveling back in time—and we’ve got the video evidence to prove it. More»

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Posted in Ancient World, Getty Villa

The Ancient Wisdom of Aphrodisiacs

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Tickle your tongue with this seductive cocktail based on ancient aphrodisiacs. More»

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Posted in Art, Paintings

Scott Schaefer on the Meaning of Collecting

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The retiring paintings curator walks the galleries with us one last time. More»

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Posted in Art, Education, J. Paul Getty Museum

Getty Museum and Khan Academy Partner in Online Learning

Getty Museum's content on Khan Academy's website

The Getty Museum and the Khan Academy will work together to create new learning resources, including videos. More»

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Posted in Ancient World, Behind the Scenes, Exhibitions and Installations

Why the Cyrus Cylinder Matters Today

The Cyrus Cylinder as installed at the Getty Villa
The Cyrus Cylinder, Achaemenid, after 539 B.C. Terracotta, 22.9 x 10 cm. The British Museum

Why is this small cylinder of baked clay so famous around the world? More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Trust, Voices

New “Getty Voices” Project Features Creative Angles on Art and Culture, One Week at a Time

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This morning we launched Getty Voices, a new social media project on The Iris led by a different member of the Getty community every week. More»

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      All Hail Tiberius, Least Media-Savvy of the Roman Emperors

      Tiberius was proclaimed Roman emperor on September 17 in AD 14, exactly 2,000 years ago.

      He was also a bit wacko. “He was the least media-savvy emperor you could imagine,” says curator David Saunders, who has been in charge of this bronze portrait of Tiberius which leaves us on September 22. He point to this description found in the writings of Cassius Dio:

      Tiberius was a patrician of good education, but he had a most peculiar nature. He never let what he desired appear in his conversation, and what he said he wanted he usually did not desire at all. On the contrary, his words indicated the exact opposite of his real purpose; he denied all interest in what he longed for, and urged the claims of what he hated. He would exhibit anger over matters that were far from arousing his wrath, and make a show of affability where he was most vexed…In short, he thought it bad policy for the sovereign to reveal his thoughts; this was often the cause, he said, of great failures, whereas by the opposite course, far more and greater successes were attained.

      Moreover, David tells us, “Tiberius’s accession itself was a farrago: Tiberius sort-of feigning reluctance, the Senate bullying him, he being all, ‘Well, if-I-have-to,’ and in the end—according to Suetonius—saying he’ll do it as long as he can retire.”

      Suetonius is full of great, albeit spurious, anecdotes about poor old Tiberius, David reports. “When someone addressed him as ‘My Lord,’ it is said, Tiberius gave warning that no such insult should ever again be thrown at him.”

      Happy accession, My Lord!

      Portrait Head of Tiberius (“The Lansdowne Tiberius”), early 1st century A.D., Roman. The J. Paul Getty Museum

      Statue of Tiberius (detail), Roman, A.D. 37, Soprintendenza Speciale per i Beni Archeologici di Napoli e Pompei – Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli, Laboratorio di Conservazione e Restauro. Currently on view at the Getty Villa following conservation and study.

      09/17/14

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