Getty Center

Holiday Lights at the Getty Center through January 3

Illuminate your holidays with art every Saturday till 9

Winter is upon us. Spend a Saturday evening at the Getty Center, when we’re open until 9pm—and enjoy a chance to stroll the Central Garden at magic hour, photograph sunset, Instagram the lights in the trees, and share videos of your friends masquerading as snowflakes all in one evening. Hunt for the special holiday lights all around campus (starting at 5:30), and stop by the Museum Entrance Hall for free hot cider.

Stop by for some inspiration in the galleries as well with the monumental tapestries in Spectacular Rubens: The Triumph of the Eucharist (through January 11) and the influential photographs of Josef Koudelka (through March 22) on view.

Share your #GettyLights photos with us @TheGetty on Instagram and Twitter. We’d love to see you all lit up!

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2 Trackbacks

  • By Home for the Holidays: LA | Taxi Magic Blog on December 19, 2013 at 8:38 am

    [...] for some lights? Get to The Getty on Saturday nights if you want to see LA’s best light [...]

  • By Holiday Fun for Kids at LA’s Best Museums on December 10, 2014 at 5:02 am

    […] Getty Center: Holiday Lights The tram alone is usually enough to get the kids squealing, but this season stop in the entrance hall on your way in for free hot apple cider. Then sip, stroll, and snap photos amid the magical trees and city lights below. Kids will love to hunt for the holiday light displays and projections going on throughout the museum. […]

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      ROSE

      This milky pink boomed into popularity because of a marketing ploy, a mistress, and its ambiguous origins.

      In an effort to compete with the renowned Meissen porcelain factory, the French Sèvres manufactory recruited the glamorous Madame de Pompadour (mistress to King Louis XV). Like a smart sponsorship deal, Sèvres gave her all the porcelain she requested. 

      Introduced in 1757, this rich pink exploded on the scene thanks to favoritism by Madame Pompadour herself. 

      The glaze itself had a weird history. To the Europeans it looked Chinese, and to the Chinese it was European. It was made based on a secret 17th-century glassmaker’s technique, involving mixing glass with flecks of gold.

      For more on colors and their often surprising histories, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

      12/19/14

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