Getty Center

Holiday Lights at the Getty Center through January 3

Illuminate your holidays with art every Saturday till 9

Winter is upon us. Spend a Saturday evening at the Getty Center, when we’re open until 9pm—and enjoy a chance to stroll the Central Garden at magic hour, photograph sunset, Instagram the lights in the trees, and share videos of your friends masquerading as snowflakes all in one evening. Hunt for the special holiday lights all around campus (starting at 5:30), and stop by the Museum Entrance Hall for free hot cider.

Stop by for some inspiration in the galleries as well with the monumental tapestries in Spectacular Rubens: The Triumph of the Eucharist (through January 11) and the influential photographs of Josef Koudelka (through March 22) on view.

Share your #GettyLights photos with us @TheGetty on Instagram and Twitter. We’d love to see you all lit up!

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  • By Home for the Holidays: LA | Taxi Magic Blog on December 19, 2013 at 8:38 am

    […] for some lights? Get to The Getty on Saturday nights if you want to see LA’s best light […]

  • By Holiday Fun for Kids at LA’s Best Museums on December 10, 2014 at 5:02 am

    […] Getty Center: Holiday Lights The tram alone is usually enough to get the kids squealing, but this season stop in the entrance hall on your way in for free hot apple cider. Then sip, stroll, and snap photos amid the magical trees and city lights below. Kids will love to hunt for the holiday light displays and projections going on throughout the museum. […]

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      #ProvenancePeek: July 31

      Every art object has a story—not only of how it was made, but of how it changed hands over time until it found its current home. That story is provenance.

      This small panel by Dutch master Gerrit Dou (photographed only in black and white) is now in the collection of the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute. It was sold to American collector Robert Sterling Clark, an heir to the Singer sewing machine fortune, in the summer of 1922.

      How do we know this? Archival sleuthing! A peek into the handwritten stock books of M. Knoedler & Co. (book 7, page 10, row 40, to be exact) records the Dou in “July 1922” (right page, margin). Turning to the sales books, which lists dates and prices, we again find the painting under the heading “New York July 1922,” with its inventory number 14892. A tiny “31” in superscript above Clark’s name indicates the date the sale was recorded.

      M. Knoedler was one of the most influential dealers in the history of art, selling European paintings to collectors whose collections formed the genesis of great U.S. museums. The Knoedler stock books have recently been digitized and transformed into a searchable database, which anyone can query for free.

      Girl at a Window, 1623–75, Gerrit Dou. Oil on panel, 10 9/16 x 7 ½ in. Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, Massachusetts


      #ProvenancePeek is a monthly series by research assistant Kelly Davis peeking into #onthisday provenance finds from the M. Knoedler & Co. archives at the Getty Research Institute.

      07/31/15

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