Behind the Scenes, Getty Center, Publications

Museum Store Reopens with a New Design

It’s back! The Museum Store at the Getty Center has just reopened after a month-long renovation.

The space hasn’t grown, but it feels bigger thanks to an airy layout, nicely integrated display cases, and a fresh arrangement of books and merchandise.

As before, books line the perimeter of the store—arranged in categories that reflect our collections, such as Photography, Paintings, and Illuminated Manuscripts. You can also find a broad selection of books on architecture, art history, and local interest. Looking for a Getty Publications title, such as the popular Symbols and Allegories in Art? They’re arranged with the other titles according to subject.

A new kids’ corner offers not only a great selection of books, but also a table—the perfect height for kids to explore—filled with a variety of fun, affordable items for aspiring young artists.

Beautiful new book tables allow for elegant and compelling displays that feature new or noteworthy titles, one of which features recent publications from the Getty—including current exhibition-related titles such as Paris: Life and Luxury in the Eighteenth Century, Walker Evans: Cuba, Fashion in the Middle Ages, and Display and Art History: The Düsseldorf Gallery and Its Catalogue.

There are gifts to satisfy a range of interests and budgets, from $1 postcards of site views and works of art in the Museum to a $435 vase made of laser-cut stainless steel lace. The new displays of scarves, ties, art-making kits, and stationery keep you looking. Perhaps the popular silk Irises scarf is just the right thing, or maybe your visit has inspired you to try your hand at watercolors with a portable paint set.

The stunning new jewelry showcases in the center of the store present a unique range of styles, from bejeweled snake bracelets to a collection of organic and sustainable pieces crafted from tagua nut, grown only in the rainforest of South America. Our knowledgeable staff is eager to share information about each artisan and will help guide you in selecting the perfect piece for yourself or for a special gift.

Small thematic displays grab your attention throughout the store: one corner features adorable yet beautifully crafted miniature reproductions of ancient Greek vases and sculptures, while a Cambodian-themed table offers sculptures, books, and exquisite handicrafts in conjunction with the Gods of Angkor exhibition. A street banner for the exhibition Paris: Life and Luxury in the Eighteenth Century graces the wall behind a focused offering of books and gift items related to the exhibition, including handsome pocket watches, gilded frames, and fleur-de-lis-embellished calligraphy pens.

And not to brag, but how many museum stores celebrate the juncture of art and science with objects that include replicas of Franz Xaver Messerschmidt’s character heads?

The store has always offered an interesting array of unique gift items and a stellar selection of books, but you had to do some creative rummaging to find what you were looking for at times. Now you can easily see everything as you look around the room, and there are also delightful surprises to be found as you move through the space.

We look forward to welcoming you in our new store! And be sure to visit the Museum Store online, where you can shop anytime.

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2 Comments

  1. Meghan Ahern Sarno
    Posted June 27, 2011 at 6:27 pm | Permalink

    Sounds great! I’m really hoping I can get out there to see it soon.

  2. Posted December 2, 2011 at 7:12 am | Permalink

    It looks like a great place to visit when I’m out there. Thanks for posting this information.

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      Head flasks were a trend starting in the 1st century A.D.

      A little taller than 6 inches, this young man’s head could be filled with any liquid. 

      Blue Head Flask, A.D. 300 - 500, Roman. J. Paul Getty Museum.

      09/20/14

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