artists’ books

Posted in Art, Manuscripts and Books, Research, Voices

Graffiti Black Book | Getty Voices

LALiberAmicorum_earlymeeting
One of the first looks at some of the pages for the Getty Graffiti Black Book. We examined a few of our special collections volumes to compare illustrations.

A cross-century, cross-community collaboration between L.A. graffiti and tattoo artists—in the tradition of Albrecht Dürer. More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Photographs, Film, and Video

The Quotable Man Ray

Datebooks and photographs from the Man Ray materials acquired by the Research Institute

Man Ray’s black and white portraits are widely celebrated, but two recent acquisitions by the Getty Research Institute shift the focus back on the famous photographer, providing a revealing picture of the often private artist. The first acquisition, a compact… More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute

Treasures from the Vault: Italian Artists’ Books

Books by Maurizio Nannucci. Top: Medium is word, 1975. Keleidoscope in a wooden box with a sliding top, 32 x 8 cm. Bottom: Museum of Modern Art, no. 15/30, 1983. Keychain inside a wooden box featuring a floor plan for a "Museum of Modern Art.” 7.3 x 10.8 cm. The Getty Research Institute, 890164, box 201 © Maurizio Nannucci
Books by Maurizio Nannucci. Top: Medium is word, 1975. Keleidoscope in a wooden box with a sliding top, 32 x 8 cm. Bottom: Museum of Modern Art, no. 15/30, 1983. Keychain inside a wooden box featuring a floor plan for a "Museum of Modern Art.” 7.3 x 10.8 cm. The Getty Research Institute, 890164, box 201 © Maurizio Nannucci
Saturday is the final day for the Santa Monica Museum of Art’s exhibition Libro/Oggetto: Italian Artists’ Books, 1960s–Now, a look at Italian artists’ books from the main art movements and trends of the second half of the 20th century. It... More»
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    • photo from Tumblr

      Did humans have eyes that close together in ancient times?

      Naaaah, this helmet is ceremonial, most like for a funerary purpose. Once adorned with horsehair, feathers or metal animal horns, this decorative helmet was certainly not functional.

      Did you notice the engraved ringlet curls at the helmet’s ‘hairline’?

      Helmet, 400 - 375 B.C., Greek. J. Paul Getty Museum.

      08/19/14

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