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Posted in Ancient World, Behind the Scenes, Getty Villa

Experience Death Salon Getty Villa

Caitlin Doughty and Judy Melinek at Death Salon Getty Villa

Audio, photos, and social media highlights from Death Salon Getty Villa. More»

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Posted in Art, Education

Will the Laptop Destroy the Coffee Shop?

Is the Internet killing public space? A Zocalo-Getty panel

Is the Internet making us weird? More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum

Curator’s Talk on James Ensor Is a Gas

James_Ensor2

What you need to know about James Ensor, in 12 minutes. More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute

Yvonne Rainer in Her Own Words

Yvonne Rainer at the Getty Research Institute

Hear artist Yvonne Rainer read from her diaries. More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books

Medieval Manuscripts Alive

Medieval Manuscripts Alive - languages

Hear medieval manuscripts read aloud. First up: Ge’ez, the language of the Ethiopian church. More»

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Posted in Education, J. Paul Getty Museum

What Can We Learn from Artists’ Projects in Museums?

Giant Hand at the Hammer Museum
Machine Project's humorous "Giant Hand" installation at the Hammer Museum tackles wayfinding through humor. Photo courtesy of the Machine Project

More and more museums are inviting artists to go beyond hanging their art on their walls to create engaging visitor experiences inside the museum. At a panel discussion earlier this week, we invited curators, educators, and artists to talk about… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes

Sound: Let There Be (Some) Light

louvers

The next time you’re in the Getty Center galleries, look up. The large louvers in the ceiling are working throughout the day to keep light-sensitive artwork from direct sunlight. The goal is to keep the amount of light coming in… More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

Connect with Art Using Google Goggles and Our New Mobile Collection Pages!

Video crew relaxing after the shoot

What is that painting? Wonder no longer. By taking a photo with the Google Goggles™ app for your smartphone, you can now instantly identify any painting in our collection, plus access related information and audio. Awesome, right? We created a… More»

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Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Traveling through Bible Lands: The Dream and the Reality (Audio)

Jacob's Well, near Shechem, Frank Mason Good (English, 1839–1928), 1860s. Albumen print, 6 1/8 x 8 1/8 in.

Begins with an introduction by Karol Wight, senior curator of antiquities. Audience Q&A follows. Running time: 59:04 | Download (MP3 file, 55.4 MB) For centuries, Americans and Europeans saw the lands of the Bible—known variously as Palestine, western Syria, and… More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes

Why? Because the Pig in the Painting Said So!

Me, giving a sculpture a gorilla hug in the 1970s

As a kid I was sure if I could be alone with works or art, in or out of museums—ditch the parents, teachers, and guards—that the works of art would talk to me. I assessed hiding places, considered alarm systems…. More»

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      It’s been 125 years since Van Gogh’s death, today we celebrate his life’s work.


      5 Ways to See Van Gogh’s Irises

      Through observations, visitor conversations, and some sneaky eavesdropping, we’ve compiled the top 5 ways people enjoy this painting.

      1. In a Crowd
        One of the most obvious ways that people see the painting is in a crowd. The gallery is almost always filled, and you might have to wait before you can get up close. The anticipation builds as you start in the back row, and slowly move until you are close enough to see the brushstrokes of Van Gogh’s thick paint.

      2. Online
        David from Colorado said that this was his first visit, but he had already seen the painting online. In addition to being available through the Getty’s Open Content program, the painting is often seen on social media. Just search #irises on Instagram for a taste of the painting’s popularity. 

      3. Alone
        If you arrive right at 10 a.m. when the museum opens, the quiet gallery provides a perfect backdrop to really examine the painting. Solitude and seclusion gives the gallery a sense of intimacy. 

      4. Multiple Times
        Repeat visits can give rise to multiple interpretations. Is it a melancholy or joyous painting? Expressive or depressive? 

      5. Internationally
        Visitors from all across the world viewed this famous Van Gogh. In just one hour I heard multiple languages—French, Italian, Chinese, Korean, German, and more. Irises seems to rise above cultural boundaries—a Dutch painting inspired by Japanese ukiyo-e prints—to strike an emotional resonance amongst all viewers. 

      What is your favorite lens to view Van Gogh’s work through? 

      07/29/15

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