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Posted in Art, Education

Will the Laptop Destroy the Coffee Shop?

Is the Internet killing public space? A Zocalo-Getty panel

Is the Internet making us weird? More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum

Curator’s Talk on James Ensor Is a Gas

James_Ensor2

What you need to know about James Ensor, in 12 minutes. More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute

Yvonne Rainer in Her Own Words

Yvonne Rainer at the Getty Research Institute

Hear artist Yvonne Rainer read from her diaries. More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books

Medieval Manuscripts Alive

Medieval Manuscripts Alive - languages

Hear medieval manuscripts read aloud. First up: Ge’ez, the language of the Ethiopian church. More»

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Posted in Education, J. Paul Getty Museum

What Can We Learn from Artists’ Projects in Museums?

Giant Hand at the Hammer Museum
Machine Project's humorous "Giant Hand" installation at the Hammer Museum tackles wayfinding through humor. Photo courtesy of the Machine Project

More and more museums are inviting artists to go beyond hanging their art on their walls to create engaging visitor experiences inside the museum. At a panel discussion earlier this week, we invited curators, educators, and artists to talk about… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes

Sound: Let There Be (Some) Light

louvers

The next time you’re in the Getty Center galleries, look up. The large louvers in the ceiling are working throughout the day to keep light-sensitive artwork from direct sunlight. The goal is to keep the amount of light coming in… More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

Connect with Art Using Google Goggles and Our New Mobile Collection Pages!

Video crew relaxing after the shoot

What is that painting? Wonder no longer. By taking a photo with the Google Goggles™ app for your smartphone, you can now instantly identify any painting in our collection, plus access related information and audio. Awesome, right? We created a… More»

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Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Traveling through Bible Lands: The Dream and the Reality (Audio)

Jacob's Well, near Shechem, Frank Mason Good (English, 1839–1928), 1860s. Albumen print, 6 1/8 x 8 1/8 in.

Begins with an introduction by Karol Wight, senior curator of antiquities. Audience Q&A follows. Running time: 59:04 | Download (MP3 file, 55.4 MB) For centuries, Americans and Europeans saw the lands of the Bible—known variously as Palestine, western Syria, and… More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes

Why? Because the Pig in the Painting Said So!

Me, giving a sculpture a gorilla hug in the 1970s

As a kid I was sure if I could be alone with works or art, in or out of museums—ditch the parents, teachers, and guards—that the works of art would talk to me. I assessed hiding places, considered alarm systems…. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

Audio: Gallery Talk on Turner’s “Modern Rome”

Modern Rome–Campo Vaccino, Joseph Mallord William Turner (English, 1775–1851), 1839. Oil on canvas, 36 1/8 x 48 1/4 in. (unframed), 48 1/4 x 60 3/8 x 4 3/8 in. (framed). The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2011.6
Modern Rome–Campo Vaccino, Joseph Mallord William Turner (English, 1775–1851), 1839. Oil on canvas, 36 1/8 x 48 1/4 in. (unframed), 48 1/4 x 60 3/8 x 4 3/8 in. (framed). The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2011.6

Emily Beeny of the Museum’s paintings department recently gave a gallery talk for eager Getty staff to acquaint us with the Museum’s new painting by J.M.W. Turner, whose arrival and installation we posted about on Friday. We invite you to… More»

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      All Hail Tiberius, Least Media-Savvy of the Roman Emperors

      Tiberius was proclaimed Roman emperor on September 17 in AD 14, exactly 2,000 years ago.

      He was also a bit wacko. “He was the least media-savvy emperor you could imagine,” says curator David Saunders, who has been in charge of this bronze portrait of Tiberius which leaves us on September 22. He point to this description found in the writings of Cassius Dio:

      Tiberius was a patrician of good education, but he had a most peculiar nature. He never let what he desired appear in his conversation, and what he said he wanted he usually did not desire at all. On the contrary, his words indicated the exact opposite of his real purpose; he denied all interest in what he longed for, and urged the claims of what he hated. He would exhibit anger over matters that were far from arousing his wrath, and make a show of affability where he was most vexed…In short, he thought it bad policy for the sovereign to reveal his thoughts; this was often the cause, he said, of great failures, whereas by the opposite course, far more and greater successes were attained.

      Moreover, David tells us, “Tiberius’s accession itself was a farrago: Tiberius sort-of feigning reluctance, the Senate bullying him, he being all, ‘Well, if-I-have-to,’ and in the end—according to Suetonius—saying he’ll do it as long as he can retire.”

      Suetonius is full of great, albeit spurious, anecdotes about poor old Tiberius, David reports. “When someone addressed him as ‘My Lord,’ it is said, Tiberius gave warning that no such insult should ever again be thrown at him.”

      Happy accession, My Lord!

      Portrait Head of Tiberius (“The Lansdowne Tiberius”), early 1st century A.D., Roman. The J. Paul Getty Museum

      Statue of Tiberius (detail), Roman, A.D. 37, Soprintendenza Speciale per i Beni Archeologici di Napoli e Pompei – Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli, Laboratorio di Conservazione e Restauro. Currently on view at the Getty Villa following conservation and study.

      09/17/14

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