Edgar Degas

Posted in Art, Prints and Drawings, Publications

The Human Predicament, in Pastel

Waiting / Degas
Owned jointly with the Norton Simon Art Foundation, Pasadena

An enigmatic pastel shows Degas’s talent for drawing human psychology. More»

Also tagged , , , , , , , 1 Response
Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Museum, Prints and Drawings

Why Is This Drawing in a Museum?

Abstract Lines / Degas
The mysterious drawing in question. Abstract Lines, about 1877, Edgar Degas. J. Paul Getty Museum.

A look inside a sketchbook by Degas reveals the story behind a unusual drawing. More»

Also tagged , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Behind the Scenes, Education, J. Paul Getty Museum

Dancing with Degas: New Curriculum Brings Art and Movement into the Classroom

Dancing with Degas - Curriculum premiere at the Getty Center
Dancing with Degas - Curriculum premiere at the Getty Center

As a fourth-grade teacher, I take every opportunity to integrate art into the classroom. So when I was asked to be on the Teacher Advisory Group for the new Performing Arts in Art curriculum for K–12 teachers, I was thrilled…. More»

Also tagged , , , , , , , Comments closed
Posted in Getty Center, J. Paul Getty Museum

Honey, They’re Playing Our Painting

Dancer Taking a Bow (The Prima Ballerina), Edgar Degas, pastel and gouache on paper, 33 1/2 x 27 in. (85.1 x 68.6 cm). Private collection

Many couples have a favorite song, a tune that conjures up memories of blissful infatuation and unending devotion. Elia and Maranatha have a painting. The couple met three years ago when Elia, a musician, was playing at a club in… More»

Also tagged , , , , 10 Responses
  • Facebook

  • Twitter

  • Tumblr

    • photo from Tumblr

      #ThyCaptionBe: You Look Like Hell

      You captioned this detail. And we’re revealing the full story now.

      Escaping the in-laws or medieval Sea World? It’s actually an extreme punishment for a dress code violation. 

      Here’s the full story:

      The Christian tale of Saint Josaphat is roughly based on the life of the Buddha in a kind of medieval game of telephone, in which the sources for the text passed through Christian circles in the Middle East in the 8th century before appearing in European versions in the 11th century. 

      Here an unsuitably dressed guest—we can see that his tattered clothing and scruffy facial hair have no place at the well-dressed gathering—is cast into the dark, open mouth of a terrifying animal. 

      To make matters worse, the story is a parable in which Barlaam, Josaphat’s Christian teacher, describes the sinful who do not make the cut at the Last Judgment.

      Holiday Lesson: Always check the dress code.

      #ThyCaptionBe is a celebration of modern interpretations of medieval aesthetics. You guess what the heck is going on, then we myth-bust.


  • Flickr