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Posted in Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Trust

2014 by the Numbers

Jim Cuno: The Getty in 2014 by the numbers

The year in review, infographic style. More»

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Posted in Getty Research Institute, Photographs, Film, and Video

Two Unforgettable Films about World War I

Still from J'Accuse featuring undead soldiers questioning their sacrifice
Still from J'Accuse

Two classics screen for the war’s centenary. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Villa

Aeschylus’s Persian Queen: An Actor’s Craft

SITI Company rehearses Persians
In rehearsal: Ellen Lauren (foreground) as the queen of Persia; Will Bond (left) as the Messenger

Bringing alive an ancient queen. More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Prints and Drawings

This Just In: Three Drawings from the Dutch Golden Age

A Hollyhock, 1682, Herman Saftleven (Dutch, 1609-1685). Watercolor, gouache and black chalk, 35.2 x 25.2 cm. © Christie's Images Limited (2014)
A Hollyhock, 1682, Herman Saftleven (Dutch, 1609-1685). Watercolor, gouache and black chalk, 35.2 x 25.2 cm. © Christie's Images Limited (2014)

A peasant portrait, botanical watercolor, and winter scene join the Getty Museum’s collection More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Prints and Drawings, Research

Who Is George Seurat’s “Indian Man”?

An Indian Man / Georges Seurat
Detail of Seurat's An Indian Man showing the finely rendered beard and topknot

Help us solve an art-historical mystery. More»

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      ROSE

      This milky pink boomed into popularity because of a marketing ploy, a mistress, and its ambiguous origins.

      In an effort to compete with the renowned Meissen porcelain factory, the French Sèvres manufactory recruited the glamorous Madame de Pompadour (mistress to King Louis XV). Like a smart sponsorship deal, Sèvres gave her all the porcelain she requested. 

      Introduced in 1757, this rich pink exploded on the scene thanks to favoritism by Madame Pompadour herself. 

      The glaze itself had a weird history. To the Europeans it looked Chinese, and to the Chinese it was European. It was made based on a secret 17th-century glassmaker’s technique, involving mixing glass with flecks of gold.

      For more on colors and their often surprising histories, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

      12/19/14

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