Getty history

Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Publications

Getty from 3 to 5pm: Museum Guidebooks, Then and Now

The Penitent Madgalene / Titian, from The J. Paul Getty Museum Guidebook, second edition

Guidebooks from the ’50s join our Virtual Library. More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Behind the Scenes, Getty Center

The Getty Center Turns 15

The Getty Center in 1997 - tram arrival plaza

Like all masterpieces, the Getty Center wasn’t built in a day. From architect selection to opening, it took 13 years. And it was well worth the wait. The J. Paul Getty Trust and all of its programs finally had a home…. More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute

J. Paul Getty, The Early Years

Young J. Paul Getty Lying on the Beach, about 1905–1915. J. Paul Getty Family Collected Papers, The Getty Research Institute, 2010.IA.17

What forces shaped J. Paul Getty into the man portrayed in his diaries? The Getty’s Institutional Archives recently acquired a collection that illuminates Getty’s formative years. In addition to many other things, the J. Paul Getty Family Collected Papers (1880s–1989)… More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute

A Look Inside J. Paul Getty’s Newly Digitized Diaries

J. Paul Getty's diary open to the page for March 29 and 30, 1952

They’re here! The diaries of J. Paul Getty are now part of the collection of the Getty’s Institutional Archives, thanks in large part to the late Jim Wood, former Trust President and CEO, who placed great value on the Getty’s history…. More»

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      #ThyCaptionBe: Warnings to the Rich & Powerful

      You captioned this detail. And we’re revealing the full story now.

      It would be awesome if this was Medieval hangman, or a really awkward frat party, but it’s actually the result of a one-letter swap gone wrong in a book about the fates of the rich. 

      Here’s the full story:

      You sometimes regret what pops out unexpectedly when you open your mouth, but in this case, even the fish must have been quite surprised when a wooly lamb burst forth. 

      The stories in this text by Giovanni Boccaccio warn of the terrible fate that often awaits the rich and powerful. He uses here the example of King Polycrates, who tossed a ring into a river, hoping for good luck, and found it later in the mouth of a fish. 

      Someone got confused, though, and instead of a ring (in French, annel), what came out instead was a lamb (agnel). Apparently, neither the ring nor the lamb worked because the king was later hanged (background).

      #ThyCaptionBe is a celebration of modern interpretations of medieval aesthetics. You guess what the heck is going on, then we myth-bust.

      08/31/15

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