Getty Research Institute collection

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute

Treasures from the Vault: 100,000 Pieces of Ephemera Tell the Story of 20th-Century Art

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A massive collection of 20th-century art ephemera is ready for research. More»

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Posted in Getty Research Institute, Research

The Artists the Internet Almost Forgot

Stacey Allan, editor at East of Borneo
Stacey Allan, editor at East of Borneo and organizer of Unforgetting L.A., hosts the first Wikipedia edit-a-thon at the Getty Research Institute.

Building Los Angeles architecture and its architects, one Wikipedia entry at a time. More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Getty Research Institute, Research

Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon at the Getty Research Institute to Focus on Architecture and Design

Wikipedia edit-a-thon at the Getty Research Institute

Join us to build a better history of L.A. art through Wikipedia. More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings

This Just In: The Genius of Lithography

The Genius of Lithography / Nicolas Henri Jacob
The Genius of Lithography, 1819, Nicolas Henri Jacob (French, 1781–1871), lithographer. Lithograph, 19.2 x 16.4 cm (sheet 22 x 18.4 cm). Originally published in Alois Senefelder, L'art de la lithographie (Munich, 1819). The Getty Research Institute, 2014.PR.8

The improbable story of the invention of lithography. More»

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Posted in Getty Research Institute, Photographs, Film, and Video, Research

This Just In: The Shunk-Kender Archive

Harry Shunk (left) and Janos Kender in 1961
Harry Shunk (left) and János Kender in 1961 at a dinner for artist Lucio Fontana at La Coupole in Montparnasse, Paris. Photo: Shunk-Kender. The Getty Research Institute, 2014.R.20

The 20th-century art scene, told in photographs. More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute

Bombing the Cathedral of Reims

German propaganda about the Rheims cathedral bombing
German propaganda card from 1917. The text reads, "The French use the cathedral of Reims as a base of operations and therewith endanger this magnificent work of art" ("Die Franzosen benutzen die Kathedrale von Reims also Operations-Baßis und gefährden damit das herrliche Kunstwerk"). via reims.fr

The battle that launched the culture clash of World War I. More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Photographs, Film, and Video

Where Is Yucatan? Julius Shulman at Chichen Itza

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Julius Shulman photographs the Yucatan, mecca for the midcentury consumer. More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings

This Just In: 19th-Century “Peep Show” Was the Forerunner of 3D Movies

Diorama of King Ludwig’s Canal, detail of etchings
Diorama of King Ludwig’s Canal (detail), about 1846, printed in Germany. Seven hand-colored etchings with front and back boards, each 16 x 22 cm. The Getty Research Institute, 2013.PR.37

Let us marvel at this low-tech wonder from the past. More»

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Posted in Getty Research Institute, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Remembering Lewis Baltz

Lewis Baltz, Paris, 1992
Lewis Baltz standing in front of his installation, Ronde de Nuit, Centre Pompidou, Paris, 1992

The influential photographer, writer, and teacher has passed. More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Research

Treasures from the Vault: The Guerrilla Girls Archive

Props used in the Guerrilla Girls' actions: plastic gun, bananas, and gorilla fingers with nail polish
Copyright © Guerrilla Girls, courtesy guerrillagirls.com

Why did art professionals put on gorilla masks and take to the streets? More»

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    • photo from Tumblr

      Princess Leia hair is so totally 300 A.D.

      A proto-Princess Leia emerges from this 1,700-year-old terracotta lamp created in North Africa. 

      We may have Roman North Africa to thank for the famous Leia hairstyle, as this braided look appears on depictions of women in ancient artworks from this region, such as the terracotta lamp (left) at the Getty and the marble sculpture (right) at the Met.

      09/04/15

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