Getty Research Institute collection

Posted in Art, Education, Getty Research Institute, Research

5,400 Images from the Getty Research Institute’s Special Collections Now Available as Open Content

Lantern design in Kangxi dengtu / Chinese
Lantern design in Kangxi dengtu (Kangxi-era lantern patterns), Chinese, 1790. Ink and watercolor, 29.7 x 24 cm. The Getty Research Institute, 2003.M.25

Thousands more images, from Renaissance prints to early photographs, join the Open Content Program. More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Research

Letters by René Magritte Join Research Institute’s Collection

Photo of Rene Magritte painting Les Promenades d'Euclide, 1955
© 2013 C. Herscovici, London / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

The artist’s business dealings with gallerist Alexander Iolas are the focus of nine revealing letters from the 1950s and ’60s. More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings

Treasures from the Vault: The Unexplored Archive of Otto Muehl

Otto Muehl 7
Otto Muehl after Joseph Beuys’s Fat Chair, 1979. The Getty Research Institute, Otto Mühl papers, circa 1918-circa 1997

A peek into the sketchbooks of the controversial founder of Viennese Actionism. More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Manuscripts and Books, Voices

Artists of the Getty Graffiti Black Book on Style, Street Art, and Special Books

Gorgs
Page by Gorgs from the artists' book L.A. Liber Amicorum

Hear from prominent graffiti artists who helped shape a 143-artist collaboration representing L.A. street art. More»

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Posted in Art, Manuscripts and Books, Research, Voices

The Getty Graffiti Black Book

LALiberAmicorum_earlymeeting
One of the first looks at some of the pages for the Getty Graffiti Black Book. We examined a few of our special collections volumes to compare illustrations.

A cross-century, cross-community collaboration between L.A. graffiti and tattoo artists—in the tradition of Albrecht Dürer. More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Paintings, Research

Treasures from the Vault: Knoedler, Mellon, and an Unlikely Sale

Venus with a Mirror / Titian
Venus with a Mirror, about 1555, Titian. Oil on canvas, 49 x 41 9/16 in. The National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., 1937.1.34. Andrew W. Mellon Collection

One of the most remarkable art sales of the 20th century, as told in documents from the Knoedler archives at the Getty Research Institute. More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute, Research

Treasures from the Vault: Harald Szeemann, From Vision to Nail

Harald Szeemann during the installation of documenta 5 in Kassel, Germany, 1972 / Balthasar Burkhard
Harald Szeemann during the installation of documenta 5 in Kassel, Germany, 1972. Photo by Balthasar Burkhard. The Getty Research Institute, Harald Szeemann papers, 1892–2010

A five-person team at the Research Institute has finished cataloging Harald Szeemann’s monumental Project Files. More»

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Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute

Gallery at the Getty Research Institute Undergoing Dramatic Expansion

This space will no longer be home to rotating exhibitions.

The GRI Gallery is expanding more than threefold, starting June 10. More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings, Research

“The Everlasting Cycle of Becoming and Fading”: Thomas W. Gaehtgens on Philipp Otto Runge’s “Times of Day”

Detail of Night from the Times of Day suite / Philipp Otto Runge

“Runge’s prints represent far more than merely the times of day. The cycle of the day represents in fact the cycle of life.” More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings

Philipp Otto Runge’s “Times of Day,” A Monument of German Romantic Art

Detail of the female figure in Evening from the Times of Day suite / Philipp Otto Runge

This remarkable four-print series depicts the coming and departing of light, which points to the cycles of life from conception to death. More»

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      Olympian Census #4: Aphrodite

      Get the stats on your favorite (and not-so-favorite) gods and goddesses on view at the Getty Center.

      Roman name: Venus

      Employment: Goddess of Love and Beauty

      Place of residence: Mount Olympus

      Parents: Born out of sea foam formed when Uranus’s castrated genitals were thrown into the ocean

      Marital status: Married to Hephaestus, the God of Blacksmiths, but had many lovers, both immortal and mortal

      Offspring: Aeneas, Cupid, Eros, Harmonia, Hermaphroditos, and more

      Symbol: Dove, swan, and roses

      Special talent: Being beautiful and sexy could never have been easier for this Greek goddess

      Highlights reel:

      • Zeus knew she was trouble when she walked in (Sorry, Taylor Swift) to Mount Olympus for the first time. So Zeus married Aphrodite to his son Hephaestus (Vulcan), forming the perfect “Beauty and the Beast” couple.
      • When Aphrodite and Persephone, the queen of the underworld, both fell in love with the beautiful mortal boy Adonis, Zeus gave Adonis the choice to live with one goddess for 1/3 of the year and the other for 2/3. Adonis chose to live with Aphrodite longer, only to die young.
      • Aphrodite offered Helen, the most beautiful mortal woman, to Paris, a Trojan prince, to win the Golden Apple from him over Hera and Athena. She just conveniently forgot the fact that Helen was already married. Oops. Hello, Trojan War!

      Olympian Census is a 12-part series profiling gods in art at the Getty Center.

      08/03/15

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