Getty Research Institute conservation

Posted in Conservation, Getty Research Institute

Preventing Digital Decay

Digitally decayed scan of a book from the Getty Research Institute / Bernard Picart
Crop of a digitally decayed scan of a page from Ceremonies et coutumes religieuses de tous les peuples du monde, representeées par des figures dessinées de la main de Bernard Picard, avec une explication historique, & quelques dissertations curieuses, 1723–1743. The Getty Research Institute, 1387-555

Digital files are fragile. What to do? More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Research Institute

Lifted Cellulose Nitrate: Conserving an Early Robert Mapplethorpe Object

Untitled box / Robert Mapplethorpe
© Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation

A conservator’s view of a complex and unusual object by Robert Mapplethorpe. More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Research Institute

Conserving Architectural Models: Behind the Scenes in the Research Institute Conservation Lab

Tom Learner and Juliane Wattig, working on an architectural model
Photo: Scott S. Warren

How are architectural models conserved? A look at the field, and two displayed in “Overdrive.” More»

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      The Perfect Male Form?

      This bronze sculpture is a copy of an ancient Roman marble statue known as the Belvedere Antinous, long considered one of the most beautiful statues to survive from antiquity. Engravings of the statue were used as models in the study of perfect body proportions.

      The bronze was once owned by Louis XIV, who purchased bronze replicas of ancient sculptures to enhance his kingly magnificence.

      A Bronze God for the Sun King

      Belvedere Antinous, about 1630, attributed to Pietro Tacca. Bronze. The J. Paul Getty Museum

      Plate 11 in Gérard Audran, Proportions of the human body, measured from the most beautiful sculptures of antiquity, 1683. The Getty Research Institute

      07/05/15

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