Getty Research Institute conservation

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute

Bringing Order to Harald Szeemann’s Unfiled Posters

Three posters from the Harald Szeemann archive
Three posters from Szeemann’s projects: 12 Environments (1968), signed by Christo; Documenta 5 (1972), designed by Edward Ruscha; and The Tendency towards the Gesamtkunstwerk (1983), designed by Markus Raetz. The Getty Research Institute, 2011.M.30

How do you organize and catalog 1,200 posters? More»

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Posted in Conservation, Getty Research Institute

Preventing Digital Decay

Digitally decayed scan of a book from the Getty Research Institute / Bernard Picart
Crop of a digitally decayed scan of a page from Ceremonies et coutumes religieuses de tous les peuples du monde, representeées par des figures dessinées de la main de Bernard Picard, avec une explication historique, & quelques dissertations curieuses, 1723–1743. The Getty Research Institute, 1387-555

Digital files are fragile. What to do? More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Research Institute

Lifted Cellulose Nitrate: Conserving an Early Robert Mapplethorpe Object

Untitled box / Robert Mapplethorpe
© Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation

A conservator’s view of a complex and unusual object by Robert Mapplethorpe. More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Research Institute

Conserving Architectural Models: Behind the Scenes in the Research Institute Conservation Lab

Tom Learner and Juliane Wattig, working on an architectural model
Photo: Scott S. Warren

How are architectural models conserved? A look at the field, and two displayed in “Overdrive.” More»

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      #ProvenancePeek: Winslow Homer at the Met

      Every art object has a story—not only of how it was made, but of how it changed hands over time until it found its current home. That story is provenance.

      The provenance of this Winslow Homer marine, or seascape, is relatively straightforward as these things go. It was entered into the stock books of M. Knoedler and Co, prominent New York art dealers, in October of 1901. Knoedler & Co purchased the painting, titled Cannon Rock, from Chicago pastor and educator Dr. Frank Gunsaulus on October 24, 1901. Just over two weeks later, on November 9, the firm sold it to art collector and dry goods merchant George Arnold Hearn. Hearn made a gift of his collection to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 1906, and that is where Cannon Rock has lived ever since.

      This seascape is one of Homer’s later works, notable for its flatness. Homer spent the last 25 years of his life living in coastal Maine, painting land- and seascapes that both respect and challenge nature’s authority. Cannon Rock’s mellow provenance tale belies the powerful scene it presents.

      The stock books of the Knoedler Gallery have recently been transformed into a searchable database which anyone can query for free.

      Cannon Rock, 1895, Winslow Homer. Oil on canvas, 40 x 40 in. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift of George A. Hearn, 1906 (above); pages from the Knoedler stock and sales books listing the painting (below).


      #ProvenancePeek is a monthly series by research assistant Kelly Davis peeking into #onthisday provenance finds from the M. Knoedler & Co. archives at the Getty Research Institute.


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