heritage conservation

Posted in Architecture and Design, Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute

Architecture Critic Paul Goldberger Advises “Don’t Squeeze Out All the Fresh Air”

Paul Goldberger
Paul Goldberger

“We’re much more sensitive in general to historic buildings than we once were.” How to move forward while preserving the past. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute, Voices

Getty Voices: Peru Field Notebook

EAI_PER_ICA_SW_201112_0280_detail

Our new Getty Voices series kicks off with a weeklong view into one of the Getty Conservation Institute’s international field projects. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Education, Getty Conservation Institute, Philanthropy

Preserving the Photographic Heritage of the Middle East

Self-portrait by photographer Camille el Kareh, taken in Lebanon in the 1920s

We treasure our family photos because they are reminders of meaningful memories. The same can be said of the photographic collections held by institutions, for they represent who we are and where we have been. When photographs become damaged or… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute, Philanthropy

Paving the Way: Mosaic Conservation Training in the Mediterranean Region

MOSAIKON course participants at the site of Herculaneum, Italy, preparing and presenting a site exercise on planning priority conservation interventions.

The Getty Conservation Institute recently completed the first training course for MOSAIKON, an ambitious collaboration dedicated to improving the  conservation and maintenance of ancient mosaics in the Mediterranean region. Begun in 2008, MOSAIKON is a partnership between the Conservation Institute,… More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute

A Project of Seismic Proportions

Earthen structures in the vast adobe city of Chan Chan, capital of the Chimu Kingdom in present-day Perum

As Californians, we are well aware of the damage that results from earthquakes, even in new buildings constructed with modern materials. But what happens to historic buildings made of earthen materials such as adobe? These structures can be particularly vulnerable… More»

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Posted in Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute

All Roads Lead to Rome

The Roman Forum

What brings a group of architects, conservators, engineers, geologists, scientists, and archaeologists from twenty countries and six continents to Rome? Rocks—or more accurately, stone. They have all come to participate in the 17th International Course on Stone Conservation, which began… More»

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Posted in Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute

What Do You Mean, “Sustainability and Cultural Heritage”?

Gold Rush-era building in Nevada City, California

When I talk about the importance of sustainability and cultural heritage, most people nod their heads—we’ve all heard the word “sustainable” in terms of the green revolution—but then a second later they usually ask, “Wait, what exactly do you mean?”… More»

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      The Perfect Male Form?

      This bronze sculpture is a copy of an ancient Roman marble statue known as the Belvedere Antinous, long considered one of the most beautiful statues to survive from antiquity. Engravings of the statue were used as models in the study of perfect body proportions.

      The bronze was once owned by Louis XIV, who purchased bronze replicas of ancient sculptures to enhance his kingly magnificence.

      A Bronze God for the Sun King

      Belvedere Antinous, about 1630, attributed to Pietro Tacca. Bronze. The J. Paul Getty Museum

      Plate 11 in Gérard Audran, Proportions of the human body, measured from the most beautiful sculptures of antiquity, 1683. The Getty Research Institute

      07/05/15

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