Jim Cuno

Posted in Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Trust

2014 by the Numbers

Jim Cuno: The Getty in 2014 by the numbers

The year in review, infographic style. More»

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Posted in Art, Paintings

Long Looks from Island to Island

Old Couple / John Currin
Artwork © John Currin. Photo: Robert McKeever

Two paintings of lovers, decades and centuries apart. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Trust

Ask Him Anything! Jim Cuno on Reddit This Monday

Jim sits down with Snoo, Reddit’s alien mascot
Jim sits down with Snoo, Reddit’s alien mascot, to prep himself for the upcoming Q&A.

Jim takes on Reddit. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Conservation Institute, Getty Foundation, Getty Research Institute, J. Paul Getty Museum, J. Paul Getty Trust

Reflections on My First Days at the Getty—And What’s Next

Jack Brogan, fabricator, and Rani Singh of the Getty Research Institute inspect De Wain Valentine's Red Concave Circle in Brogan's studio in Inglewood, California, June 17, 2011

The J. Paul Getty Trust is an extraordinary arts institution. That I knew before coming to work at the Getty this week as its president and CEO. What I didn’t know—couldn’t know until I became a full part of this organization—was… More»

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      ROSE

      This milky pink boomed into popularity because of a marketing ploy, a mistress, and its ambiguous origins.

      In an effort to compete with the renowned Meissen porcelain factory, the French Sèvres manufactory recruited the glamorous Madame de Pompadour (mistress to King Louis XV). Like a smart sponsorship deal, Sèvres gave her all the porcelain she requested. 

      Introduced in 1757, this rich pink exploded on the scene thanks to favoritism by Madame Pompadour herself. 

      The glaze itself had a weird history. To the Europeans it looked Chinese, and to the Chinese it was European. It was made based on a secret 17th-century glassmaker’s technique, involving mixing glass with flecks of gold.

      For more on colors and their often surprising histories, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

      12/19/14

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