lectures

Posted in Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute

Conserving Mosaics in the Field: Challenges and Rewards

Mosaic of the Transfiguration in the basilica of the Holy Monastery of Saint Catherine, Sinai. Photo: Robert S. Nelson

Update: video of this lecture is available here. Amid the moon-like landscape of the Sinai, the Holy Monastery of Saint Catherine has stood unfailing for 17 centuries, unaltered by invasion or conquest. Imagine a place rooted in the ancient world… More»

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Posted in Education, J. Paul Getty Museum

Andrei Codrescu: The Art Lesson

What's so funny? Andrei Codrescu against the Getty Center travertine.

Andrei Codrescu has some bad news for you. You, Web user, are running out of time. You may already suspect that you work for Mark Zuckerberg and your screens. But did you also know that you are on your way… More»

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Posted in Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute

What Do You Mean, “Sustainability and Cultural Heritage”?

Gold Rush-era building in Nevada City, California

When I talk about the importance of sustainability and cultural heritage, most people nod their heads—we’ve all heard the word “sustainable” in terms of the green revolution—but then a second later they usually ask, “Wait, what exactly do you mean?”… More»

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Posted in Antiquities, J. Paul Getty Museum

My Odyssey through the Aegean Islands

Paros marble, Milos Obsidian, and Naxos emery

Art historian and archaeologist Nigel McGilchrist is taking us to the Aegean—and you can come along! On January 13, he’ll give a free illustrated talk at the Getty Villa on his nearly seven years exploring seventy of these beautiful islands,… More»

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Posted in Education, J. Paul Getty Museum

Tonight: Peter Greenaway on Cinema and Art History

Peter Greenaway. Phot: Dennis van Doorn

Filmmaker Peter Greenaway speaks at the Getty Center tonight as part of our Getty Perspectives lecture series, which invites distinctive artists and scholars to offer their perspectives on the visual arts. I’ve long wanted Peter Greenaway to be part of… More»

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Posted in Antiquities, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum

Art and Performance in Classical Greece (AUDIO)

Fragmentary Mixing Vessel with Oedipus Discovering the Truth, Greek, made in Sicily, 330–320 B.C.; found in Syracuse. Fragmentary red-figured calyx krater attributed to the Capodarso Painter. Terracotta, 9 7/15 x 18 1/2 in. (24 x 30 cm). Museo Archeologico Regionale Paolo Orsi, Syracusa, Italy, 66557. Su concessione dell'Assessorato ai Beni Culturali e dell'Identità Siciliana della Regione Siciliana - Palermo
Fragmentary Mixing Vessel with Oedipus Discovering the Truth, Greek, made in Sicily, 330–320 B.C.; found in Syracuse. Fragmentary red-figured calyx krater attributed to the Capodarso Painter. Terracotta, 9 7/15 x 18 1/2 in. (24 x 30 cm). Museo Archeologico Regionale Paolo Orsi, Syracusa, Italy, 66557. Su concessione dell'Assessorato ai Beni Culturali e dell'Identità Siciliana della Regione Siciliana - Palermo

Works of art offer a tantalizing window onto the world of ancient Greek theater, providing rich clues to the stories, music, costumes, masks, and actors of ancient tragedies, satyr plays, and comedies. I hope you’ll enjoy this talk, which complements… More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Objects and Memories: Edmund de Waal on Tracing a Family Collection

Albert Cahen d’Anvers, Pierre Auguste Renoir, 1881. The J. Paul Getty Museum. The portrait was sold by the Cahen d’Anvers family to a Swiss gallery in 1971.

When you visit a museum, it’s easy to forget that objects have a story, a journey from where they began to where they are now. Take Pierre-Auguste Renoir’s portrait of the composer Albert Cahen d’Anvers. It’s one of the most… More»

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Posted in Getty Center, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Friday Night: Susan Meiselas Discusses Her Work at the Getty Center

Traditional Indian dance mask adopted by the rebels during the fight against Somoza, Nicaragua, Susan Meiselas, negative 1978; print 1980s © Susan Meiselas / Magnum Photos
Photographer Susan Meiselas appears at the Getty Center this Friday evening to talk about her work and screen her 1991 film Pictures from a Revolution. Joining her to discuss the depiction of Latin America is Miguel Tinker Salas, professor of... More»
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Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Center, Photographs, Film, and Video

Jean-Léon Gérôme, from “Gladiator” to “The Matrix”

detail_gladiator1
“Gérôme forged narrative practices that would take the cinema decades to invent,” art historian Marc Gotlieb told a packed auditorium recently in a discussion of The Spectacular Art of Jean-Léon Gérôme, which closes this Sunday. Really? How could a 19th-century... More»
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Posted in Getty Center, Getty Research Institute

Encuentros Quemando con Surreal Encanto

Adorée au grand air (collage on sandpaper), César Moro, 1935. The Getty Research Institute, 980029 © Andre Coyne
Digging for fire at the Getty Research Institute’s recent symposium Vivísimo Muerto: Debates on Surrealism in Latin America, I recalled Guillaume Apollinaire’s thoughts on what I believe to be the essence of Surrealism: “When man wanted to make a machine... More»
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      ROSE

      This milky pink boomed into popularity because of a marketing ploy, a mistress, and its ambiguous origins.

      In an effort to compete with the renowned Meissen porcelain factory, the French Sèvres manufactory recruited the glamorous Madame de Pompadour (mistress to King Louis XV). Like a smart sponsorship deal, Sèvres gave her all the porcelain she requested. 

      Introduced in 1757, this rich pink exploded on the scene thanks to favoritism by Madame Pompadour herself. 

      The glaze itself had a weird history. To the Europeans it looked Chinese, and to the Chinese it was European. It was made based on a secret 17th-century glassmaker’s technique, involving mixing glass with flecks of gold.

      For more on colors and their often surprising histories, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

      12/19/14

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