Getty Foundation, Getty Research Institute

Symposium on Latin American Art: Live Online This Weekend

Update—videos of this event have been archived here.

The three-day symposium Between Theory and Practice: Rethinking Latin American Art in the 21st Century is streaming live this weekend, from Friday March 11 through Sunday March 13.

We invite you to join us online or on-site at the Getty Center on Friday and the Museum of Latin American Art (MOLAA) on Saturday and Sunday for this event, which brings together an international group of scholars, curators, museum directors, and artists to discuss new approaches to the study and presentation of Latin American art in the 21st century. The schedule is available here.

Presentations and discussion focus on three key areas: the role of the museum in the collection, contextualization, and representation of Latin American art; the production of revisionist art histories through innovative research methodologies, new interpretative frameworks and archive-based scholarship; and experimental curatorial models ranging from historic to contemporary case studies for the interpretation and presentation of art from Latin America.

Videos will be archived following the symposium here.

<em>Mapa quemado/Burned Map</em>, Horacio Zabala (Argentinian, b. 1943), 1974, mixed media on printed map. Courtesy of the artist and Henrique Faria Fine Art, New York

Mapa quemado/Burned Map, Horacio Zabala (Argentinian, b. 1943), 1974, mixed media on printed map. Courtesy of the artist and Henrique Faria Fine Art, New York

“Between Theory and Practice: Rethinking Latin American Art in the 21st Century” was conceived by Cecilia Fajardo-Hill, chief curator at MOLAA, and organized by MOLAA in collaboration with the Getty Research Institute, and with funding support from the Getty Foundation. This is part one of a two-part symposium; part two takes place at the Museo de Arte de Lima, Peru on November 2, 3, and 4, 2011.

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      Olympian Census #3: Poseidon

      Get the stats on your favorite (and not-so-favorite) gods and goddesses on view at the Getty Center.

      Roman name: Neptune

      Employment: God of the Sea

      Place of residence: A fancy palace somewhere in the Aegean Sea

      Parents: Cronus and Rhea

      Marital status: Married to Amphitrite, a sea goddess, but had many affairs just like his brother Zeus

      Offspring: Had many children including Triton, Theseus, Orion, Polyphemos and Arion

      Symbol: Trident, horse, and dolphin

      Special talent: Starting earthquakes & Shapeshifting into a horse to pursue women

      Highlights reel:

      • When Goddess Demeter turned into a mare to escape Poseidon’s pursuit, Poseidon also turned into a horse and mated with her, creating a talking horse baby, Arion.
      • Athena became the patron goddess of Athens over Poseidon by giving the city an olive tree, which produced wood, oil, and food. Poseidon had given them a salt-water spring. Nice going, Poseidon.
      • Poseidon cursed Olysseus to wander the seas for 10 years after the Trojan War in revenge for Olysseus blinding his son, the cyclops Poplyphemos.

      Olympian Census is a 12-part series profiling gods in art at the Getty Center.

      07/27/15

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