Pacific Standard Time

Posted in Getty Foundation, People & Places, technology

Eight Reasons to Look Forward to Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA

Marie Orensanz, Limitada, 1978, Photograph, edition 1 of 5, 13 3/4 x 19 11/16 in. (35 x 50 cm), Courtesy of the artist.
© Marie Orensanz

A peek at what’s in store in 2017. More»

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Posted in Art, Art & Archives, Getty Foundation, Getty Research Institute, Miscellaneous

The Local Newspaper That Helped Shape a Chicano Identity

Luis C. Garza, former photographer for La Raza magazine, is helping digitize 20,000 images from its archive.
Luis C. Garza, former photographer for La Raza magazine, is helping digitize 20,000 images from its archive.

Thousands of historic negatives from La Raza magazine are being digitized for Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA. More»

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Posted in Art, Art & Archives, Getty Foundation, Getty Research Institute

LA/LA: Place and Practice

The Political Equator / from a presentation by Teddy Cruz
Courtesy of Teddy Cruz

“We have no reason for coming together other than to be woven together.” More»

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Posted in Art & Archives, Behind the Scenes, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Foundation

Art Historians Share Progress on Exhibitions for Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA

Discussion panel during the Pacific Standard Time workshop at the Getty Center, October 2014
Discussion panel during the Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA workshop

Work is in full swing on dozens of Pacific Standard Time exhibitions slated for 2017. More»

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Posted in Art, Art & Archives, Getty Foundation, Scholarship

Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA Begins Today

Caixa de fazer amor / Teresinha Soares
Photo: Miguel Aun. Courtesy of Teresinha Soares

A major new initiative to study and celebrate Latin American and Latino art. More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Art, Art & Archives

Architecture as Art in Culver City

BeehiveHoriz

“Public art can contribute to defining a city’s identity and to unifying its vision,” and buildings contribute to this identity too! More»

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Posted in Art, Art & Archives, Getty Research Institute, Paintings, Scholarship

Frederick Hammersley Foundation Donates Archive to the Getty Research Institute

Page from Notebook 3 / Frederick Hammersley
Page from Notebook 3, Frederick Hammersley, 1978. Artwork © Frederick Hammersley Foundation

“Despite their precise lines and construction, Hammersley’s work displays a personal touch, guided by his belief in intuition as an important principle for art making.” More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Art & Archives, Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Editor's Picks, Getty Research Institute, technology

Conserving Architectural Models: Behind the Scenes in the Research Institute Conservation Lab

Tom Learner and Juliane Wattig, working on an architectural model
Photo: Scott S. Warren

How are architectural models conserved? A look at the field, and two displayed in “Overdrive.” More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Art & Archives, Editor's Picks, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute, J. Paul Getty Museum

Subterranean L.A.: The Urban Oil Fields

Union 76 Refinery / Connell
Union 76 Refinery at Night, about 1950, Will Connell. Gelatin silver print, 18 1/4 x 23 1/4 x 1/4 in. Lent by Stephen White, Collection II. Artwork © Will Connell

Since the 1890s, Los Angeles has literally and figuratively been built upon acres of ancient oil deposits deep beneath its shifting surface. More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Art & Archives

Unearthing ‘70s Architecture in L.A.

Cesar Pelli's Pacific Design Center
Kent Kanouse on Flickr, CC BY-NC 2.0

The 1970s are the “missing years” of L.A.’s architectural history. A reappraisal. More»

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      #ProvenancePeek: Titian in Boston

      Every art object has a story—not only of how it was made, but of how it changed hands over time until it found its current home. That story is provenance.

      Portrait of a Man Holding a Book, in the collection of Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts, is no exception. The MFA carefully details the painting’s Italian provenance on its collection page, but the path of this object even since then is complex.

      Between 1901 and 1907, Portrait of a Man Holding a Book entered the stock of no less than three galleries, purchased from the Italian family who owned it first by Agnew’s in London, then by Trotti in Paris, and then by Cottier in New York (marking its movement from the Old World to the New). A collector purchased it from Cottier, and the painting was held privately for 36 years.

      That collector was Frederick Bayley Pratt (1865–1945), son of Charles Pratt, oil magnate and founder of the Brooklyn Institute that bears his family’s name (incidentally, this writer’s alma mater!). 

      The Knoedler Gallery dealt frequently with members of the Pratt family. A quick peek into the searchable database of Knoedler’s stock books turns up nine instances in which a Pratt (Charles and Mary, Frederick’s parents, or Herbert and John, his brothers) bought works, as well as five instances where they sold works. This Titian portrait is one of those instances. Frederick Pratt sold the work to Knoedler in early April of 1943, and by the 10th, it had been snapped up by the Museum of Fine Arts.

      Knoedler shared the sale with Pinakos, an art-dealing concern owned and operated by Rudolf J. Heinemann. Purchasing works in tandem with other dealers was a widespread practice amongst powerful art galleries of the time; nearly 6,000 records in the Knoedler database had joint ownership.

      The stock books of the Knoedler Gallery have recently been transformed into a searchable database that anyone can query for free. You can find this Titian under stock number A2555.

      Portrait of a Man Holding a Book, about 1540, Titian (Tiziano Vecellio). Oil on canvas. The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Charles Potter Kling Fund. Photograph © Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; stock and sales books documenting the painting’s sale by M. Knoedler & Co.

      _______

      ProvenancePeek is a monthly series by research assistant Kelly Davis peeking into provenance finds from the M. Knoedler & Co. archive at the Getty Research Institute.

      04/29/16

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