SFMOMA

Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations

Garry Winogrand’s Scenes of Ebulliance, and Unease

Coney Island, New York. c. 1952. Gelatin silver print, 8 11/16 x 12 15/16" (22 x 33 cm). Purchase and gift of Barbara Schwartz in memory of Eugene M. Schwartz. Estate of Garry Winogrand, courtesy of Fraenkel Gallery
Coney Island, New York. c. 1952. Gelatin silver print, 8 11/16 x 12 15/16" (22 x 33 cm). Purchase and gift of Barbara Schwartz in memory of Eugene M. Schwartz. Estate of Garry Winogrand, courtesy of Fraenkel Gallery

A retrospective now at the Met captures America’s postwar “out-of-control-ness” More»

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Posted in Getty Foundation, Philanthropy, Publications, Research

What Is a Page in the Digital Age?

On Performativity / Walker Art Center
View of the Walker’s new OSCI publication, On Performativity. Image courtesy Walker Art Center

A new crop of digital museum catalogues reinvents the page for the 21st century. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Foundation, Publications

New SFMOMA Catalogue Gives Museums 5 Reasons to Embrace Digital Publishing

SFMOMA's Rauschenberg Research Project

SFMOMA’s new online catalogue of Robert Rauschenberg’s work harnesses multimedia, archival material, and more. More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Foundation, Publications, Voices

OSCI and The Future of Digital Publishing | Getty Voices

AnneHelmreich_digipubs

Digital isn’t just revolutionizing publishing. It’s revolutionizing the museum. More»

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Posted in Getty Foundation, Research

Looking With New Eyes at Scholarly Art Catalogues

SFMOMA, one of the participants in the OSCI initiative, has chosen to focus on Robert Rauschenberg, given their significant holdings of his work, and their team is gathering together curatorial essays, conservation documentation, audio interviews and related materials in a single online resource. Image: Collection (formerly Untitled), Robert Rauschenberg, 1954, oil, paper, fabric, wood, and metal on canvas, SFMOMA
SFMOMA, one of the participants in the OSCI initiative, has chosen to focus on Robert Rauschenberg, given their significant holdings of his work, and their team is gathering together curatorial essays, conservation documentation, audio interviews and related materials in a single online resource. Image: Collection (formerly Untitled), Robert Rauschenberg, 1954, oil, paper, fabric, wood, and metal on canvas, SFMOMA

The scholarly catalogue has long been a critical part of a museum’s mission, providing authoritative information about collection objects for scholars, students, and the general public. Richly illustrated and often based on years of painstaking research, print catalogues form one… More»

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      gettypubs:

      COBALT

      The histories of many colors are amazing, but cobalt may well have the most brilliant of them all. From the Ming Dynasty to Renaissance Italy, cobalt was a popular glaze for porcelain and other ceramics. Cobalt ink is invisible unless exposed to flame, which turns it a vivid green. In the 17th century, this quality made Europeans believe it was witchcraft, but decades later it was used as a neat trick on fire screens. It wasn’t until 1802 that painters added cobalt to their palette. 

      It is this little tidbit from cobalt’s history that saved master forger Han van Meergeren’s skin after WWII, when he was tried for collaborating with the Nazis. Want to find out how some art history sleuthing and smart science got him a not guilty verdict? Hint: Don’t try to forge a Vermeer with cobalt! 

      Read all about it in The Brilliant History of Color in Art!

      Images, clockwise:

      Glazed earthenware dish with a marchant ship, Italy, about 1510. 

      Glazed earthenware tile floor, Spain, about 1425-50.

      Porcelain lidded vase, China, about 1662-1772.

      All objects from the J. Paul Getty Museum. 

      12/18/14

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