stained glass

Posted in Art, Publications

My Lifelong Quest for Color

Stained glass window at Chartres Cathedral
Stained glass window at Chartres Cathedral. Photo: Fr Lawrence Lew, O.P., CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Writer Victoria Finlay devotes her life to uncovering the human stories behind colors More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books, Scholarship

Revisiting a Florentine Master

Left: A Bust of a Pope-Saint, about 1310-1315, Pacino di Bonaguida.  Pot-metal and clear glass, black and brown vitreous paint, 35 13/16 x 26 3/8 in. Museo dell’Opera di Santa Croce, Fondo Edifici di Culto, Ministero dell’Interno, Florence. Center: Saint Francis in Antiphonary, about 1320, Pacino di Bonaguida.  Tempera colors and gold leaf on parchment, 20 ½ x 13 15/16in.  Archivio di Santa Croce, Florence, Corale Q, fol. 121v (Photo: Bryan C. Keene). Right: Chiarito Tabernacle (detail), 1340s, Pacino di Bonaguida. Gilded gesso and tempera on panel, 39 7/8 x 44 11/16 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 85.PB.311
Left: A Bust of a Pope-Saint, about 1310-1315, Pacino di Bonaguida. Pot-metal and clear glass, black and brown vitreous paint, 35 13/16 x 26 3/8 in. Museo dell’Opera di Santa Croce, Fondo Edifici di Culto, Ministero dell’Interno, Florence. Center: Saint Francis in Antiphonary, about 1320, Pacino di Bonaguida. Tempera colors and gold leaf on parchment, 20 ½ x 13 15/16in. Archivio di Santa Croce, Florence, Corale Q, fol. 121v (Photo: Bryan C. Keene). Right: Chiarito Tabernacle (detail), 1340s, Pacino di Bonaguida. Gilded gesso and tempera on panel, 39 7/8 x 44 11/16 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 85.PB.311

New research on Pacino di Bonaguida, a central figure in the rise of the Renaissance in Florence. More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Manuscripts and Books

Art and Experience in Canterbury and L.A.

Installation view of Canterbury and St. Albans at the Getty Center
Inside Canterbury and St. Albans at the Getty Center. Pages from the St. Albans Psalter, foreground: Bibliothek Hildesheim. Stained-glass panels from the Ancestors of Christ Windows, Courtesy Dean and Chapter of Canterbury

A medieval prayer book was a personal liturgical space. Small and portable, one needed only to open the book to enter. More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations

The Miracles at Canterbury

Thomas Becket Window / Canterbury
St. Thomas Becket Window (detail), made in 1919 from fragments of 13th-century glass, Canterbury Cathedral. Photo: TTaylor via Wikimedia Commons

Born from Thomas Becket’s martyrdom on December 29, 1170, the stained glass in Trinity Chapel at Canterbury Cathedral reveals some of the most fascinating tales of the miraculous. More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum

Bigger Than Ourselves: Episcopal Priest Dr. Gwynne Guibord on Finding the Sacred through Art

Panels from the Ancestors of Christ Windows, Canterbury Cathedral, England, 117880. Colored glass and vitreous paint; lead came. Courtesy Dean and Chapter of Canterbury
Panels from the Ancestors of Christ Windows, Canterbury Cathedral, England, 1178–80. Colored glass and vitreous paint; lead came. Courtesy Dean and Chapter of Canterbury

“All space, all beings, and all creation is sacred—but we don’t walk through life seeing it that way. Art offers a transition, helping us leave behind the secular world and move into a sacred place.” More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations

The Fearless Modernity of Canterbury Stained Glass

Leonie Seliger and Laura Atkinson
Leonie Seliger and Laura Atkinson, glass conservators from Canterbury Cathedral!

What does Jackson Pollock have to do with medieval stained glass? Leonie Seliger explains. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Voices

Getty Voices: Designing Canterbury and St. Albans

The digital rendering of the installation of the pieces.
The digital rendering of the installation of the pieces.

Perfectly angled lecterns and a massive glass wall presented plenty of creative challenges for the designers of the exhibition “Canterbury and St. Albans.” More»

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Posted in Art, Education, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books

Did Parchment Smell? Your Manuscript Questions, Answered

Jean de Mandeville
Jean de Mandeville

“To make egg tempera paint, egg is mixed with water and pigment, which somewhat neutralizes the decomposition process of eggs, but it is also spread so thinly and dries so quickly that it never really has the chance to rot. Therefore it doesn’t smell.”
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      #ProvenancePeek: Shark Attack!

      Every art object has a story—not only of how it was made, but of how it changed hands over time until it found its current home. That story is provenance.

      This dynamic painting of a 1749 shark attack in Havana, Cuba, by John Singleton Copley was too good to paint only once. The original hangs at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. A second full-sized version of the painting, which Copley created for himself, was inherited by his son and eventually gifted to the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

      The third version (shown here) is slightly reduced in size, with a more vertical composition. It resides in the Detroit Institute of Arts.

      A quick peek into the digitized stock and sales books of art dealer M. Knoedler & Co. at the Getty Research Institute shows the sale of Copley’s masterpiece. It was entered under stock number A3531 in July 1946 and noted as being sold to the Gallery by Robert Lebel, a French writer and art expert. The Knoedler clerk also carefully records the dimensions of the painting—30 ¼ x 36 inches, unframed.

      On the right side of the sales page you’ll find the purchaser listed as none other than the Detroit Institute of Arts. The corresponding sales book page gives the address: Woodward Ave, Detroit, Mich., still the location of the museum.

      Watson and the Shark, 1782, John Singleton Copley. Detroit Institute of Arts

      _______

      #ProvenancePeek is a monthly series by research assistant Kelly Davis peeking into #onthisday provenance finds from the M. Knoedler & Co. archives at the Getty Research Institute.

      02/10/16

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