About: Bryan C. Keene

I’m assistant curator in the Department of Manuscripts at the Getty Museum. I'm pursuing a PhD at The Courtauld Institute of Art in London and I hold a master’s from Syracuse University in Italian Renaissance art as well as a bachelor’s degree from Pepperdine University in art history and Romance linguistics and cultures. My most recent project was the exhibition and book Gardens of the Renaissance. I was also contributing curator and author to the exhibition and catalogue Florence at the Dawn of the Renaissance: Painting and Illumination, 1300–1350. I am currently working on the exhibition Renaissance Splendors of the Northern Italian Courts, which opens March 31, 2015.

Posts by Bryan C.

Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books

Deathly Meditations in Medieval Manuscripts

The Martyrdom of Saint Sebastian, Master of Sir John Fastolf, about 1430-40. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. 5, fol. 36v
The Martyrdom of Saint Sebastian, Master of Sir John Fastolf, about 1430-40. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. 5, fol. 36v

Death is coming. Prepare with these images from illuminated manuscripts. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books

A Manuscript Collector’s Perspective

What draws an art collector to focus on Renaissance manuscripts? More»

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Posted in Art, Manuscripts and Books

The Wars to Come: Game of Thrones and Medieval Art

Philosophy Consoling Boethius and Fortune Turning the Wheel (detail) from The Consolation of Philosophy by Boethius, Coëtivy Master (Henri de Vulcop?), about 1460—70. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. 42. Leaf 1v
Philosophy Consoling Boethius and Fortune Turning the Wheel (detail) from The Consolation of Philosophy by Boethius, Coëtivy Master (Henri de Vulcop?), about 1460—70. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. 42. Leaf 1v

A medievalist’s-eye-view of Game of Thrones, season 5. More»

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Posted in Art, Manuscripts and Books

Medieval Meditations on the Human Condition

Initial K: Caritas from Gradual, Master of the Cypresses (Pedro de Toledo?), about 1430-1440. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. 15, verso
Initial K: Caritas from Gradual, Master of the Cypresses (Pedro de Toledo?), about 1430-1440. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. 15, verso

In honor of Day With(out) Art, a selection of images that make us more human. More»

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Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books

The Ghost That Wasn’t There

A Monk and Guy’s Widow Conversing with the Soul of Guy de Thurno (detail) in The Vision of the Soul of Guy de Thurno, Simon Marmion, 1475. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. 31, fol. 7
A Monk and Guy’s Widow Conversing with the Soul of Guy de Thurno (detail) in The Vision of the Soul of Guy de Thurno, Simon Marmion, 1475. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. 31, fol. 7

What does an invisible ghost look like? Um, well, like this. More»

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Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books

Delightfully Horrifying Manuscript Illuminations

Halloween5

Selections from the collection for Halloween. More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books, Research

Revisiting a Florentine Master

Left: A Bust of a Pope-Saint, about 1310-1315, Pacino di Bonaguida.  Pot-metal and clear glass, black and brown vitreous paint, 35 13/16 x 26 3/8 in. Museo dell’Opera di Santa Croce, Fondo Edifici di Culto, Ministero dell’Interno, Florence. Center: Saint Francis in Antiphonary, about 1320, Pacino di Bonaguida.  Tempera colors and gold leaf on parchment, 20 ½ x 13 15/16in.  Archivio di Santa Croce, Florence, Corale Q, fol. 121v (Photo: Bryan C. Keene). Right: Chiarito Tabernacle (detail), 1340s, Pacino di Bonaguida. Gilded gesso and tempera on panel, 39 7/8 x 44 11/16 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 85.PB.311
Left: A Bust of a Pope-Saint, about 1310-1315, Pacino di Bonaguida. Pot-metal and clear glass, black and brown vitreous paint, 35 13/16 x 26 3/8 in. Museo dell’Opera di Santa Croce, Fondo Edifici di Culto, Ministero dell’Interno, Florence. Center: Saint Francis in Antiphonary, about 1320, Pacino di Bonaguida. Tempera colors and gold leaf on parchment, 20 ½ x 13 15/16in. Archivio di Santa Croce, Florence, Corale Q, fol. 121v (Photo: Bryan C. Keene). Right: Chiarito Tabernacle (detail), 1340s, Pacino di Bonaguida. Gilded gesso and tempera on panel, 39 7/8 x 44 11/16 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 85.PB.311

New research on Pacino di Bonaguida, a central figure in the rise of the Renaissance in Florence. More»

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Posted in Art, Manuscripts and Books

A Medievalist’s Viewing Guide to “Game of Thrones,” Season 4

Chess Problem (detail) from Book of Chess Problems, late 14th century.  Tempera colors and gold leaf on parchment, 9 ¾ x 6 5/8 in. (24.8 x 16.8 cm). Ms. Ludwig XV 15, fol. 97
Chess Problem (detail) from Book of Chess Problems, late 14th century. Tempera colors and gold leaf on parchment, 9 ¾ x 6 5/8 in. (24.8 x 16.8 cm). Ms. Ludwig XV 15, fol. 97

What a season it was. Let’s watch it again, manuscripts in hand. More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books

Medieval Manuscripts Alive

Medieval Manuscripts Alive - languages

Hear medieval manuscripts read aloud. First up: Ge’ez, the language of the Ethiopian church. More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books

The Middle Ages and Modern Abstraction

The Virgin and Child with the Archangels Michael and Gabriel from Gospel Book, about 1504 - 1505. 13 9/16 x 10 ¼ in. (34.5 x 26.5 cm). MS. 102, FOL. 19V
The Virgin and Child with the Archangels Michael and Gabriel from Gospel Book, about 1504 - 1505. 13 9/16 x 10 ¼ in. (34.5 x 26.5 cm). MS. 102, FOL. 19V

Abstraction was no modern innovation—it’s been an integral part of art across the centuries. More»

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      Olympian Census #3: Poseidon

      Get the stats on your favorite (and not-so-favorite) gods and goddesses on view at the Getty Center.

      Roman name: Neptune

      Employment: God of the Sea

      Place of residence: A fancy palace somewhere in the Aegean Sea

      Parents: Cronus and Rhea

      Marital status: Married to Amphitrite, a sea goddess, but had many affairs just like his brother Zeus

      Offspring: Had many children including Triton, Theseus, Orion, Polyphemos and Arion

      Symbol: Trident, horse, and dolphin

      Special talent: Starting earthquakes & Shapeshifting into a horse to pursue women

      Highlights reel:

      • When Goddess Demeter turned into a mare to escape Poseidon’s pursuit, Poseidon also turned into a horse and mated with her, creating a talking horse baby, Arion.
      • Athena became the patron goddess of Athens over Poseidon by giving the city an olive tree, which produced wood, oil, and food. Poseidon had given them a salt-water spring. Nice going, Poseidon.
      • Poseidon cursed Olysseus to wander the seas for 10 years after the Trojan War in revenge for Olysseus blinding his son, the cyclops Poplyphemos.

      Olympian Census is a 12-part series profiling gods in art at the Getty Center.

      07/27/15

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