The Huntington

Posted in Photographs, Film, and Video

Two American Photographers at Home

Wales, boy pushing pram / Bruce Davidson
© Bruce Davidson/Magnum Photos

Two American photographers are united through a new exhibition at the Huntington. More»

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Posted in Photographs, Film, and Video

5 Questions about the State of Photography in L.A. Today

Los Angeles at dusk

Quick takes on photography and L.A. from four experts. More»

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Posted in Art, Photographs, Film, and Video

The California Dream, In Photographs

View to patio and swimming pool, Mr. and Mrs. Jack Moss residence, Pacific Palisades, c. 1944
View to patio and swimming pool, Mr. and Mrs. Jack Moss residence, Pacific Palisades, c. 1944, Maynard Parker

A foil to Julius Shulman’s B&W glamour, Maynard Parker captured middle-class modernism. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

Audio: Gallery Talk on Turner’s “Modern Rome”

Modern Rome–Campo Vaccino, Joseph Mallord William Turner (English, 1775–1851), 1839. Oil on canvas, 36 1/8 x 48 1/4 in. (unframed), 48 1/4 x 60 3/8 x 4 3/8 in. (framed). The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2011.6
Modern Rome–Campo Vaccino, Joseph Mallord William Turner (English, 1775–1851), 1839. Oil on canvas, 36 1/8 x 48 1/4 in. (unframed), 48 1/4 x 60 3/8 x 4 3/8 in. (framed). The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2011.6

Emily Beeny of the Museum’s paintings department recently gave a gallery talk for eager Getty staff to acquaint us with the Museum’s new painting by J.M.W. Turner, whose arrival and installation we posted about on Friday. We invite you to… More»

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    • photo from Tumblr

      ROSE

      This milky pink boomed into popularity because of a marketing ploy, a mistress, and its ambiguous origins.

      In an effort to compete with the renowned Meissen porcelain factory, the French Sèvres manufactory recruited the glamorous Madame de Pompadour (mistress to King Louis XV). Like a smart sponsorship deal, Sèvres gave her all the porcelain she requested. 

      Introduced in 1757, this rich pink exploded on the scene thanks to favoritism by Madame Pompadour herself. 

      The glaze itself had a weird history. To the Europeans it looked Chinese, and to the Chinese it was European. It was made based on a secret 17th-century glassmaker’s technique, involving mixing glass with flecks of gold.

      For more on colors and their often surprising histories, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

      12/19/14

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