Villa dei Papiri

Posted in Ancient World, Antiquities

Is That Available as an e-Book? Scrolling through an Ancient Text

Attic Red-Figure Cup Fragment
Attic Red-Figure Cup Fragment (detail); Akestorides Painter, Greek (Attic), active about 470 - 450 B.C.; Athens, Greece, Europe; about 470 - 450 B.C.; Terracotta; Object (greatest extent): 6.8 cm (2 11/16 in.); 86.AE.324

An ancient depiction of a classroom and the mysterious marked letters on a scroll; but what do these letters mean? More»

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Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Villa

A Virtual Model of the Villa dei Papiri

Side view of the virtual-reality model of the Villa of the Papyri in Herculaneum

The exhibition Inside Out: Pompeian Interiors Exposed at the Italian Cultural Institute includes a virtual-reality model of the Villa dei Papiri (Villa of the Papyri) in Herculaneum that I recently developed at UCLA’s Experiential Technologies Center with support from the Friends… More»

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Posted in Antiquities, Gardens and Architecture, Getty Villa, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Come Eye to Wild Eye with the Bronze Sculptures in the Getty Villa Gardens

Close-up of eyes on Chiurazzi bronze replica in the Atrium at the Getty Villa
Watching you? Inlaid eyes on a "Bust of a Young Woman" in the Atrium of the Getty Villa

Accompanying you as you wander the gardens at the Getty Villa are 44 beings in bronze—animals, gods, satyrs, troubled philosophers, athletic youths crouched for action, wild-eyed old men with scraggly beards. These are replicas of ancient Roman sculptures commissioned by… More»

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      ROSE

      This milky pink boomed into popularity because of a marketing ploy, a mistress, and its ambiguous origins.

      In an effort to compete with the renowned Meissen porcelain factory, the French Sèvres manufactory recruited the glamorous Madame de Pompadour (mistress to King Louis XV). Like a smart sponsorship deal, Sèvres gave her all the porcelain she requested. 

      Introduced in 1757, this rich pink exploded on the scene thanks to favoritism by Madame Pompadour herself. 

      The glaze itself had a weird history. To the Europeans it looked Chinese, and to the Chinese it was European. It was made based on a secret 17th-century glassmaker’s technique, involving mixing glass with flecks of gold.

      For more on colors and their often surprising histories, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

      12/19/14

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