Zocalo Public Square

Posted in Art, Education

Will the Laptop Destroy the Coffee Shop?

Is the Internet killing public space? A Zocalo-Getty panel

Is the Internet making us weird? More»

Also tagged , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Architecture and Design, Art

Which Artist Would You Recommend to a Space Alien?

Malin House ("Chemosphere") / John Lautner
Malin House ("Chemosphere"), 1960, designed by John Lautner. Photo by Julius Shulman, 1961. Julius Shulman Photography Archive. The Getty Research Institute, 2004.R.10

A beginner’s guide to the human mind and heart. More»

Also tagged , , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Art

Struck by Lightning at the Louvre

Crowds throng the Mona Lisa at the Louvre Museum, Paris
Today's Louvre—glorious crowds and all. It was different in 1969. Photo: Gabriel Cabreira, CC BY-ND 2.0

Sometimes the best way to discover your life’s work is by simple good luck. More»

Also tagged , , 4 Responses
Posted in Art, Photographs, Film, and Video

David Hockney in the Promised Land

Woldgate Woods, 26, 27 & 30 July 2006 / David Hockney
Artwork © David Hockney. Photo: Richard Schmidt

“Why is vibrant color, like green, characteristic of Hockney’s landscapes of Northern England? I think it has to do with the nearly 30 years that he lived in L.A.” More»

Also tagged , , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Center

Student-Built Día de los Muertos Altar Pays Tribute to L.A.’s Saints

saint
The altarpiece to Saint Luke, patron saint of artists

A larger-than-life altarpiece featuring Saint Luke occupies the auditorium for Día de los Muertos. More»

Also tagged , , , , 1 Response
  • Facebook

  • Twitter

  • Tumblr

    • photo from Tumblr

      ROSE

      This milky pink boomed into popularity because of a marketing ploy, a mistress, and its ambiguous origins.

      In an effort to compete with the renowned Meissen porcelain factory, the French Sèvres manufactory recruited the glamorous Madame de Pompadour (mistress to King Louis XV). Like a smart sponsorship deal, Sèvres gave her all the porcelain she requested. 

      Introduced in 1757, this rich pink exploded on the scene thanks to favoritism by Madame Pompadour herself. 

      The glaze itself had a weird history. To the Europeans it looked Chinese, and to the Chinese it was European. It was made based on a secret 17th-century glassmaker’s technique, involving mixing glass with flecks of gold.

      For more on colors and their often surprising histories, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

      12/19/14

  • Flickr