About: Emily Ho

I work on the Getty Conservation Institute's AATA Online, helping to make conservation information available to people worldwide. In my Getty career, I have also been an editor of the Bibliography of the History of Art and a Research Library assistant. When I'm not immersed in the world of art and information, I love to cook, eat, and write about food and explore the mountains, beaches, and deserts of Southern California.

Posts by Emily

Posted in Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Museum

Natalie Merchant on Art, Poetry, and Music

Natalie Merchant. Photo: Mark Seliger
Natalie Merchant. Photo: Mark Seliger

On a rainy afternoon at the Getty Center, two dozen students and teachers anxiously awaited the arrival of Natalie Merchant. Stopping at the Getty on her national tour, the singer-songwriter had invited them to attend a workshop on the theme… More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Center, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Picturing Food: A New Social Art?

Untitled from the series British Food, Martin Parr, 1995. © Martin Parr/Magnum Photos

Drop your fork! I need to take a picture! Perhaps you’ve heard this exclamation, followed by the snap of a camera, while dining at a restaurant or sitting down to a home-cooked meal. Maybe you have even said it yourself,… More»

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      ROSE

      This milky pink boomed into popularity because of a marketing ploy, a mistress, and its ambiguous origins.

      In an effort to compete with the renowned Meissen porcelain factory, the French Sèvres manufactory recruited the glamorous Madame de Pompadour (mistress to King Louis XV). Like a smart sponsorship deal, Sèvres gave her all the porcelain she requested. 

      Introduced in 1757, this rich pink exploded on the scene thanks to favoritism by Madame Pompadour herself. 

      The glaze itself had a weird history. To the Europeans it looked Chinese, and to the Chinese it was European. It was made based on a secret 17th-century glassmaker’s technique, involving mixing glass with flecks of gold.

      For more on colors and their often surprising histories, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

      12/19/14

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