Behind the Scenes, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum

Video: “Elektra” Director and Cast on Working in the Villa’s Outdoor Theater

What is it like to perform Greek tragedy in an outdoor theater setting? The director, the composer and musical director, and cast members of the sold-out new production of Sophocles’ Elektra—which premieres tonight at the Getty Villa—gave us their take as they prepared to open the show. The production features a newly commissioned translation by Timberlake Wertenbaker of this epic tragedy of revenge and redemption, which is one of Sophocles’ most elegantly structured and emotionally wrenching works.

Update as of Thursday afternoon—a few tickets have just been released for this weekend’s performances.

Carey Perloff and Olympia Dukakis begin, followed by Manoel Felciano, who plays Orestes (at 1:16); composer and musical director Bonfire Madigan Shive (at 2:07); and Pamela Reed, who plays Clytemnestra (at 5:04).

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      #ProvenancePeek: Winslow Homer at the Met

      Every art object has a story—not only of how it was made, but of how it changed hands over time until it found its current home. That story is provenance.

      The provenance of this Winslow Homer marine, or seascape, is relatively straightforward as these things go. It was entered into the stock books of M. Knoedler and Co, prominent New York art dealers, in October of 1901. Knoedler & Co purchased the painting, titled Cannon Rock, from Chicago pastor and educator Dr. Frank Gunsaulus on October 24, 1901. Just over two weeks later, on November 9, the firm sold it to art collector and dry goods merchant George Arnold Hearn. Hearn made a gift of his collection to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 1906, and that is where Cannon Rock has lived ever since.

      This seascape is one of Homer’s later works, notable for its flatness. Homer spent the last 25 years of his life living in coastal Maine, painting land- and seascapes that both respect and challenge nature’s authority. Cannon Rock’s mellow provenance tale belies the powerful scene it presents.

      The stock books of the Knoedler Gallery have recently been transformed into a searchable database which anyone can query for free.

      Cannon Rock, 1895, Winslow Homer. Oil on canvas, 40 x 40 in. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift of George A. Hearn, 1906


      #ProvenancePeek is a monthly series by research assistant Kelly Davis peeking into #onthisday provenance finds from the M. Knoedler & Co. archives at the Getty Research Institute.


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