performances

Posted in Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Museum

Great Literature Inspires Culinary Creations for “Selected Shorts”

Pea tendrils with scallop / Getty Restaurant
Spring on a plate: Pea tendrils over scallop pays humorous homage to Lydia Davis's story "Letter to a Frozen Peas Manufacturer"

Two of life’s pleasures come together this weekend: stories and food. More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum

The Power of Poetry: 6 Questions for Amber Tamblyn

ambertamb

“Poetry has the power to make you feel every human emotion all at once.” More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Center

Travertine Improv

Four hands transform the Getty Center into a massive musical instrument. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum

How Do You Sing The Renaissance? Lionheart Does a Roaring Good Job

Pentecost in the Laudario of Sant'Agnese / Master of the Dominican Effigies

We’re welcoming Lionheart, one of America’s leading ensembles in vocal chamber music, for a concert this Saturday. Their performance of music from the early Renaissance complements the exhibition Florence at the Dawn of the Renaissance: Painting and Illumination, 1300-1350. The… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Villa

Unmasking Scandal at Villa Theater Lab

unmasking_scandal

Villa Theater Lab invites performers to work in residence at the Getty Villa for two weeks, workshopping new theater pieces and presenting them in four performances over a single weekend. For the past two weeks, Rogue Artists Ensemble has been… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Center

Kalpa: No Strings Attached

string_people

Dancers, a World War II searchlight, and 400 spools of thread combined to turn the Getty Center’s Arrival Plaza into a performative installation last Friday night. Hirokazu Kosaka’s Kalpa was part of the Pacific Standard Time Public Art Festival, an… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute

Fire and Ice: Artists Get Ready for the Pacific Standard Time Festival

A visitor admires one of the original Disappearing Environments structures in 1968. Photo: Lloyd Hamrol

From January 19 to 29, the Pacific Standard Time Performance and Public Art Festival will present more than 30 new public art commissions and re-invented works of performance art inspired by the amazing history of art in Southern California. As… More»

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Posted in Getty Foundation, Getty Research Institute

T-Minus 30 Days to Citywide Performance Art Festival

Three Weeks in May / Suzanne Lacy

The Pacific Standard Time Performance and Public Art Festival opens on January 19. For 11 days, artists will be activating public spaces across the city with a variety of performances and public art. From Pomona to Santa Monica beach, these… More»

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Posted in Exhibitions and Installations

¡Sí Cuba! SoCal

title, Alex Harris

What is “¡Sí Cuba! SoCal,” you ask? Well, it all started in New York this spring with a multi-venue festival celebrating Cuban culture, called ¡Sí Cuba!. Then, coincidentally, several cultural institutions across Southern California, including we here at the Getty,… More»

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Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum

Festival a Family Affair at the Getty Center

family_affair

Early-morning showers and threatening clouds didn’t keep families from coming to our most recent Family Festival, a celebration of Chinese, Indian, and Japanese culture. More than 7,600 kids and parents attended the festivities that took place throughout the Getty Center…. More»

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      From you have I been absent in the spring,
      When proud-pied April, dressed in all his trim,
      Hath put a spirit of youth in everything,
      That heavy Saturn laughed and leaped with him,
      Yet nor the lays of birds, nor the sweet smell
      Of different flowers in odor and in hue,
      Could make me any summer’s story tell,
      Or from their proud lap pluck them where they grew.
      Nor did I wonder at the lily’s white,
      Nor praise the deep vermilion in the rose;
      They were but sweet, but figures of delight,
      Drawn after you, you pattern of all those.
      Yet seemed it winter still, and, you away,
      As with your shadow I with these did play.

      —William Shakespeare, born April 23, 1564

      Vase of Flowers (detail), 1722, Jan van Huysum. The J. Paul Getty Museum

      04/23/14

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