Monthly Archives: November 2010

Posted in Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute, Getty Foundation, Paintings

Dürer’s Conserved Adam and Eve Unveiled at the Prado

Conservator George Bisacca from the Metropolitan Museum of Art working on a panel. Image courtesy of the Museo del Prado

In 1507, German Renaissance painter Albrecht Dürer painted life-size figures of Adam and Eve, defining their forms with a fluid and continuous line.  These spectacular oil-on-panel paintings, which have just undergone a lengthy conservation, went on display again last week… More»

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Posted in Getty Center, Getty Villa, Photographs, Film, and Video

Share Your Visit with Us on Flickr


What inspires you to pull out your camera and take a photo? We love to see visitors capturing moments at the Getty Villa and the Getty Center to share with family and friends. If you have photos of your visit… More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Research Institute

Career Profile: Albrecht Gumlich, Objects Conservator

Albrecht Gumlich, objects conservator at the Getty Research Institute

What do you do at the Getty? I’m an objects conservator at the Getty Research Institute. The GRI houses a vast research library, with all sort of material relating to art history. Our special collections contain photographs, prints and drawings,… More»

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Posted in Gardens and Architecture, Getty Villa

Tea by the Sea, A Tribute to the Villa’s Past

View of the former Tea Room from what is now the Museum entrance

Tea by the Sea, a new experience of the ancient Mediterranean inspired by the herbs and fruits of the Getty Villa’s gardens, kicks off December 2. The idea of offering tours and tea at the Villa stemmed from the requests… More»

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Posted in Education, Getty Center, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

High School Students Explore Photojournalism with Sudharak Olwe


Don’t call Sudharak Olwe a teacher. When the photojournalist from India met with a class from Venice High School at the Getty Center to discuss technique and creativity in photography, he turned the gathering from a workshop into a conversation…. More»

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Posted in Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute, Research

Ancient Greek Pottery Lends Its Secrets to Future Space Travel

XANES maps a) optical image showing black gloss (right) and coral red (left), b) distribution of Fe2+ species (measuring iron present in an oxidation state), and c) distribution of Fe3+ species (measuring specific minerals present).  Getty Conservation Institute

What do cutting-edge research into future space travel and the investigation of ancient ceramic pots have in common? More than you’d think. More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Research

Explore New Features and Tools on the Getty Research Institute’s Website

Caption TK

Eighteen months ago we at the Getty Research Institute decided to give our website a complete overhaul. A small group formed and spent the first three months looking through hundreds and hundreds of pages on our site. We talked, and… More»

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Posted in Getty Research Institute

Frederic Tuten and Steve Martin Talk Art and Fiction


On October 12, novelist Frederic Tuten and actor and writer Steve Martin appeared at the Getty Center as part of the Getty Research Institute’s ongoing series Modern Art in Los Angeles. The evening was a not only a departure from… More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

Beyond the First Impression: Rediscovering Monet in Paris

The Portal of Rouen Cathedral in Morning Light, Claude Monet, 1894
The Portal of Rouen Cathedral in Morning Light, Claude Monet, 1894

Though his name has become synonymous with the 19th century’s canonical movement of Impressionism, and though his masterpieces hang proudly in the halls of the world’s finest museums, Claude Monet has long been—for me—a confounding artist. He was one of… More»

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Posted in Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum

Storyteller Daniel Morden Discusses His Craft


Breathing life into ancient tales is both a challenge and an art. Master storyteller Daniel Morden, who performs this weekend at the Getty Villa, has perfected it. His passion and zeal for classic stories—at the Villa, selections from Ovid’s Metamorphoses and… More»

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    • Polo and Fishing Fore-Edge Painting


      These idyllic fore-edge paintings come from Mary Grey Lundie Duncan’s book entitled Memoir of Mrs. Mary Lundie Duncan: Being Recollection of a Daughter by Her Mother, third edition, published in 1846. After her daughter’s untimely death at 25, Mary Grey Lundie Duncan recorded her daughter’s life and her hymns. Mary Lundie Duncan wrote hymns for her children, most notably “Jesus, tender Shepherd, hear me” and “My Saviour, be Thou near me.”

      As with an earlier post that focused on fore-edge paintings, the art added to books by owners do not always match the subject matter. It’s unclear when the art was added, but polo and fly fishing do not seem to have much of a relationship to the young life of a devout Scottish woman.

      There is more to this book. It was donated to the library by Mr. and Mrs. Herman Brown in memory of their friend Florence Rice “Floy” Rodman Barnhardt. She was born in Minnesota and died in Houston, TX. Her husband, Gen. George Columbus Barnhardt, commanded the 28th Infantry Division in World War I. She and her husband are buried in United States Military Academy Post Cemetery at West Point. The relationship between Floy Rodman Barnhardt and the Browns is unknown, but it must have been close.

      Thanks to our new archival assistant, Alicia Fan, for making the gifs.

      Sources consulted: Mary Lundie Duncan hymns, Minister Henry Duncan, Find a Grave: Florence Rice “Floy” Rodman Barnhardt, and Find a Grave: Gen. George Columbus Barnhardt.

      Fore-edge paintings are fore-ever awesome.


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