Monthly Archives: April 2014

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Conservation Institute

Science Behind Glass

Getty Conservation Institute scientist Vincent Beltran working on high-tech frames
Photo: S. Warren

Santa Ana winds are no match for these high-tech frames. More»

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Posted in Art, Prints and Drawings, Publications

The Human Predicament, in Pastel

Waiting / Degas
Owned jointly with the Norton Simon Art Foundation, Pasadena

An enigmatic pastel shows Degas’s talent for drawing human psychology. More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute

10 Features of L.A.’s Union Station Not to Miss

lights_southpatio3blog

The top ten hidden design gems of L.A.’s Union Station. More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute, Research

Connecting Seas: The Getty Research Institute in Manila

Exterior of San Sebastian Church. Completed in 1891, this neo-Gothic all-steel church, the only one of its kind in Asia, is made of pre-fabricated steel elements fabricated in Belgium. Photo: Jaime S. Martinez
Exterior of San Sebastian Church. Completed in 1891, this neo-Gothic all-steel church, the only one of its kind in Asia, is made of pre-fabricated steel elements fabricated in Belgium. Photo: Jaime S. Martinez

“For all of us, the trip was revelatory on many levels.” More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Photographs, Film, and Video, Research, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

77,000 Images of Tapestries and Italian Monuments Join the Open Content Program

Italian sculpture / Max Hutzel
Max Hutzel photographed Italy for 30 years, documenting architecture, paintings, frescoes, sculpture, manuscripts, metalwork and other "arte minore" (minor arts). The Getty Research Institute, 86.P.8

Photographs of Italian monuments and European tapestries join the Open Content Program. More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations

Hot Sauce, Be My Fiery Muse

Hot sauce / Michael Hsiung
Hot sauce + pen-and-ink = Michael Hsiung's ode to L.A. cuisine, the poster image for LA Heat: Taste Changing Condiments at the Chinese American Museum

How do you make art about Tapatío and Sriracha? First, eat many tacos… More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Villa

Uncovering the History of a Long-Buried Byzantine Treasure

Hagia Sophia mosaic of the Virgin Mary
The Virgin Mary wears ornamented cuffs to secure her sleeves in this mosaic in Hagia Sophia. Photo from Mosaics of Thessaloniki: 4th to 14th century, ed. Charalambos Bakirtzis (Athens: 2012)

A woman’s gold cuff provides a window into the rich history of Thessaloniki. More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Manuscripts and Books, Research

16th-Century Album Records Social Network of Europeans in Istanbul

Leaf 119 verso and 120 recto from Johann Joachim Prack von Asch’s liber amicorum (book of friends), 1587–1612. The Getty Research Institute, 2013.M.24
Leaf 119 verso and 120 recto from Johann Joachim Prack von Asch’s liber amicorum (book of friends), 1587–1612. The Getty Research Institute, 2013.M.24

Newly acquired “book of friends” provides insight into European contact with the Ottoman Empire. More»

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Posted in Ancient World, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum

What Did Byzantine Food Taste Like?

Spoons with Inscriptions / Byzantine
Image courtesy of and © Benaki Museum, Athens, 2013

In the kitchen with the Byzantines. More»

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Posted in Art, Prints and Drawings

Leonardo da Vinci, Renaissance Lefty

Detail of a Caricature of a Man with Bushy Hair / Leonardo da Vinci
Caricature of a Man with Bushy Hair (detail), about 1494, Leonardo da Vinci. Pen and brown ink, 2 5/8 x 2 1/8 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 84.GA.647

Leonardo da Vinci’s drawings contain a little-known secret. More»

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      It’s been 125 years since Van Gogh’s death, today we celebrate his life’s work.


      5 Ways to See Van Gogh’s Irises

      Through observations, visitor conversations, and some sneaky eavesdropping, we’ve compiled the top 5 ways people enjoy this painting.

      1. In a Crowd
        One of the most obvious ways that people see the painting is in a crowd. The gallery is almost always filled, and you might have to wait before you can get up close. The anticipation builds as you start in the back row, and slowly move until you are close enough to see the brushstrokes of Van Gogh’s thick paint.

      2. Online
        David from Colorado said that this was his first visit, but he had already seen the painting online. In addition to being available through the Getty’s Open Content program, the painting is often seen on social media. Just search #irises on Instagram for a taste of the painting’s popularity. 

      3. Alone
        If you arrive right at 10 a.m. when the museum opens, the quiet gallery provides a perfect backdrop to really examine the painting. Solitude and seclusion gives the gallery a sense of intimacy. 

      4. Multiple Times
        Repeat visits can give rise to multiple interpretations. Is it a melancholy or joyous painting? Expressive or depressive? 

      5. Internationally
        Visitors from all across the world viewed this famous Van Gogh. In just one hour you can hear multiple languages—French, Italian, Chinese, Korean, German, and more. Irises seems to rise above cultural boundaries—a Dutch painting inspired by Japanese ukiyo-e prints—to strike an emotional resonance amongst all viewers. 

      What is your favorite lens to view Van Gogh’s work through? 

      07/29/15

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