About: Alexandria Sivak

I'm senior communications specialist at the J. Paul Getty Trust, and handle media outreach for the Getty Conservation Institute, Getty Foundation, and the Getty Museum's Department of Photographs.

Posts by Alexandria

Posted in Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Outdoor Sculpture at Long Beach Campus Gets a Fresh Look

Duet after repainting. Courtesy University Art Museum, California State University, Long Beach
Duet after repainting. Courtesy University Art Museum, California State University, Long Beach

CSU Long Beach’s remarkable outdoor sculpture collection is being newly conserved More»

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Posted in Getty Center, Getty Villa

Getty Center and Getty Villa Open Late This Summer

Getty Center sunset
Getty Center at sunset

The Getty’s open late this summer! More»

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Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Coming in 2016: Robert Mapplethorpe

Thomas / Mapplethorpe
Jointly acquired by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, with funds provided by The David Geffen Foundation and The J. Paul Getty Trust. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2011.7.31. © Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation

A major retrospective of the artist’s work is coming in March 2016. More»

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Posted in Art, Education, J. Paul Getty Museum

Barbara Kruger and L.A. Teenagers Team Up to Ask, “Whose Values?”

Installation of Barbara Kruger's Whose Values in the Museum Entrance Hall

The contemporary artist worked with over 400 high schoolers to question, comment, and create. More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

The Bully Has Left the Room

Untitled / George Seeley
Untitled, about 1903, George Seeley. Platinum print, 19.2 x 24.3 cm. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, 84.XM.163.3.

While James Ensor is away, Pictorialist photographs will play. More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Prints and Drawings

Watteau’s Elegant Ladies, Reunited

Lady and her mirror image. Details of original and counterproof of Seated Woman with a Fan (details), early 18th century, Jean-Antoine Watteau. Image left: The J. Paul Getty Museum, 82.GB.164. Image right: Collection Ariane and Lionel Sauvage
Lady and her mirror image. Details of original and counterproof of Seated Woman with a Fan (details), early 18th century, Jean-Antoine Watteau. Image left: The J. Paul Getty Museum, 82.GB.164. Image right: Collection Ariane and Lionel Sauvage

Two sister Watteau drawings reunite in a new exhibition. More»

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Posted in Getty Center, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum

Free Summer Fun at the Getty

Families participating in Family Art Stops
Families participating in Family Art Stops

Hands-on art programs for kids of all ages at the Getty this summer. More»

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Posted in Ancient World, Art, Exhibitions and Installations

A Trip through Byzantine Greece

Kastoria
Photo courtesy of the Hellenic Ministry of Culture and Sports

Three stunning sites in Greece are home to remarkable Byzantine art and architecture. More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Children in Another World: The Photographs of Arthur Tress

Boy with Root Hands, New York, New York, 1971. Arthur Tress (American, born 1940). Gelatin silver print. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles. © Arthur Tress.
Boy with Root Hands, New York, New York, 1971, Arthur Tress. Gelatin silver print, 10 1/16 x 10 3/16 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2013.68.13. © Arthur Tress

The inner lives of children take form in the American photographer’s surreal, compelling images. More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Photographs, Film, and Video

Diorama-rama: History Behind Glass

Polar Bear, 1976, Hiroshi Sugimoto (Japanese, born 1948), gelatin silver print, © Hiroshi Sugimoto, The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, Purchased with funds provided by the Photographs Council
© Hiroshi Sugimoto

Photographer Hiroshi Sugimoto plays with dioramas’ tension between real and fake, fact and spectacle. More»

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      It’s been 125 years since Van Gogh’s death, today we celebrate his life’s work.


      5 Ways to See Van Gogh’s Irises

      Through observations, visitor conversations, and some sneaky eavesdropping, we’ve compiled the top 5 ways people enjoy this painting.

      1. In a Crowd
        One of the most obvious ways that people see the painting is in a crowd. The gallery is almost always filled, and you might have to wait before you can get up close. The anticipation builds as you start in the back row, and slowly move until you are close enough to see the brushstrokes of Van Gogh’s thick paint.

      2. Online
        David from Colorado said that this was his first visit, but he had already seen the painting online. In addition to being available through the Getty’s Open Content program, the painting is often seen on social media. Just search #irises on Instagram for a taste of the painting’s popularity. 

      3. Alone
        If you arrive right at 10 a.m. when the museum opens, the quiet gallery provides a perfect backdrop to really examine the painting. Solitude and seclusion gives the gallery a sense of intimacy. 

      4. Multiple Times
        Repeat visits can give rise to multiple interpretations. Is it a melancholy or joyous painting? Expressive or depressive? 

      5. Internationally
        Visitors from all across the world viewed this famous Van Gogh. In just one hour you can hear multiple languages—French, Italian, Chinese, Korean, German, and more. Irises seems to rise above cultural boundaries—a Dutch painting inspired by Japanese ukiyo-e prints—to strike an emotional resonance amongst all viewers. 

      What is your favorite lens to view Van Gogh’s work through? 

      07/29/15

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