About: Dana Hutt

I'm a program assistant at Getty Foundation and an architectural historian with a focus on modern and contemporary architecture in Southern California. At the Foundation, among other things, I work on the initiative Pacific Standard Time Presents: Modern Architecture in L.A.

Posts by Dana

Posted in Architecture and Design, Art & Archives

Unearthing ‘70s Architecture in L.A.

Cesar Pelli's Pacific Design Center
Kent Kanouse on Flickr, CC BY-NC 2.0

The 1970s are the “missing years” of L.A.’s architectural history. A reappraisal. More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Art & Archives, Getty Foundation, Philanthropy

New SCI-Arc Media Archive Allows Forward-Oriented Institution to Look Back

Frank O. Gehry from the SCI-Arc Media Archive

On an elegant white background, I see familiar faces, many of whom are much younger and in their prime: Charles and Ray Eames in black and white; a dark-haired, mustachioed Frank Gehry; and Reyner Banham, the keen observer of early-1970s… More»

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      #ProvenancePeek: Titian in Boston

      Every art object has a story—not only of how it was made, but of how it changed hands over time until it found its current home. That story is provenance.

      Portrait of a Man Holding a Book, in the collection of Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts, is no exception. The MFA carefully details the painting’s Italian provenance on its collection page, but the path of this object even since then is complex.

      Between 1901 and 1907, Portrait of a Man Holding a Book entered the stock of no less than three galleries, purchased from the Italian family who owned it first by Agnew’s in London, then by Trotti in Paris, and then by Cottier in New York (marking its movement from the Old World to the New). A collector purchased it from Cottier, and the painting was held privately for 36 years.

      That collector was Frederick Bayley Pratt (1865–1945), son of Charles Pratt, oil magnate and founder of the Brooklyn Institute that bears his family’s name (incidentally, this writer’s alma mater!). 

      The Knoedler Gallery dealt frequently with members of the Pratt family. A quick peek into the searchable database of Knoedler’s stock books turns up nine instances in which a Pratt (Charles and Mary, Frederick’s parents, or Herbert and John, his brothers) bought works, as well as five instances where they sold works. This Titian portrait is one of those instances. Frederick Pratt sold the work to Knoedler in early April of 1943, and by the 10th, it had been snapped up by the Museum of Fine Arts.

      Knoedler shared the sale with Pinakos, an art-dealing concern owned and operated by Rudolf J. Heinemann. Purchasing works in tandem with other dealers was a widespread practice amongst powerful art galleries of the time; nearly 6,000 records in the Knoedler database had joint ownership.

      The stock books of the Knoedler Gallery have recently been transformed into a searchable database that anyone can query for free. You can find this Titian under stock number A2555.

      Portrait of a Man Holding a Book, about 1540, Titian (Tiziano Vecellio). Oil on canvas. The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Charles Potter Kling Fund. Photograph © Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; stock and sales books documenting the painting’s sale by M. Knoedler & Co.

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      ProvenancePeek is a monthly series by research assistant Kelly Davis peeking into provenance finds from the M. Knoedler & Co. archive at the Getty Research Institute.

      04/29/16

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