About: Patricia Harpring

I am the managing editor of the Getty Vocabulary Program, which compiles, edits, and publishes the three Getty vocabularies (AAT, TGN, ULAN, with the new CONA in development; see the Getty Vocabularies page). I do training and publish papers at various conferences around the country and abroad. My new book, Introduction to Controlled Vocabularies, is fast becoming a textbook in library schools. I have a PhD in Italian Renaissance art history; I have worked in the arenas of art standards and vocabularies at the Getty since 1985. This acquired knowledge of terms and trivia is helpful in the outside world too: I’m a respected opponent in Scrabble. More about Patricia Harpring: Career Profile: Patricia Harpring, Managing Editor of the Getty Vocabulary Program

Posts by Patricia

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute

What Is 砂金石? The Art & Architecture Thesaurus Publishes Chinese Terms

Necklace with aventurine
Necklace featuring 砂金石 (shā jīn shí), also known as venturina and aventurien

The big news in the Getty Vocabulary Program is that around 3,150 records in the Art & Architecture Thesaurus with one or more Chinese-language equivalent terms, plus descriptive notes and bibliographic citations in Chinese, are now published online. The Art… More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Conservation, Getty Research Institute

An Update on the Earthquake in Chile

Earthquake damage at the Museo de Bellas Artes de Talca, Chile. Photo: Jorge Sacaan Riadi

The Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus (AAT) is a tool for cataloging and retrieving art information. It is being translated into several languages. Our friend and colleague Lina Nagel (manager of the AAT Spanish translation project) at the Centro de… More»

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      Make, Model of Ancient Laptop Discovered

      In a pioneering study, a team of art historians, archaeologists, and philologists has determined the technical specs of this ancient laptop, an object that has long eluded analysis. The primitive ancient device, it was announced via PDF attachment emailed from aol.com, most closely resembles a Gateway Handbook 486 with a 80 megabyte hard drive. The side ports are probably USB -2.0 and/or an ingenious hard-drive cooling system employing flowing water.

      Experts could only speculate as to the operating system and UI of the millennia-old apparatus. Some postulated a primitive round button that the ancient user would press to toggle between applications.

      Tools used in the study included looking, close looking while drinking beer, and super super close looking.

      04/01/15

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