About: Isabella Zuralski

As senior special collections cataloger at the Getty Research Institute, I write finding aids for archival collections and catalog prints and drawings for the Research Library. I've written finding aids for numerous collections, including the Wassily Kandinsky papers, the Wilhelm Arntz papers, the Julius S. Held papers, the Heim Gallery records, the Albert Renger-Patzsch papers, the Galerie Schmela records, and a collection on Bauhaus typography. I am currently writing the finding aid for the G. Cramer Oude Kunst gallery records. I've also cataloged European prints, as well as rare books from the library's collections on festivals, and I am a member of the library's bibliography team. I earned my PhD in art history in 1984 from the University of Cologne, Germany, and joined the Getty Research Institute in 1989 after working in the antiquarian book trade.

Posts by Isabella

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute

Treasures from the Vault: 100,000 Pieces of Ephemera Tell the Story of 20th-Century Art

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A massive collection of 20th-century art ephemera is ready for research. More»

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Posted in Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings, Research

Treasures from the Vault: Heinrich Geissler’s Groundbreaking Archive

Black and white photograph of an unsigned drawing of a man holding a bow
Study photograph of an unsigned drawing of a man holding a bow

A newly catalogued archive sheds light on how art history was written in Germany after the war. More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings

Treasures from the Vault: The Unexplored Archive of Otto Muehl

Otto Muehl 7
Otto Muehl after Joseph Beuys’s Fat Chair, 1979. The Getty Research Institute, Otto Mühl papers, circa 1918-circa 1997

A peek into the sketchbooks of the controversial founder of Viennese Actionism. More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Research

Nazis Collecting Art: Art Dealer Gustav Cramer’s Wartime Records

Postcard showing the interior of Galerie G. Cramer in The Hague, circa 1967

A rare resource for the study of the art market in Europe during World War II is now available for research at the Getty Research Institute: the correspondence of Gustav Cramer and his son Hans Max Cramer, owners of the G. Cramer… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute

Treasures from the Vault: The Sky Gets a Chance! Gordon Matta-Clark Works on View at the Research Library

Display case of Gordon Matta-Clark materials at the Getty Research Institute framed against the sky

A new display case about American artist Gordon Matta-Clark just opened at the Research Library at the Getty Research Institute. I selected the items in the small case—which is just past the reception desk of the Research Institute lobby—from the archive… More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute

Treasures from the Vault: Artwork by Richard Tuttle Discovered in the Archive of Galerie Schmela

Detail of calligraphy in a letter from Richard Tuttle to Alfred Schmela, 1968

As I was recently working on the archive of  the German art dealer Alfred Schmela, I discovered an unusual  mailing  sent by American postminimalist artist Richard Tuttle. Addressed to Alfred Schmela and his wife Monika in Düsseldorf, Germany, it was… More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute

Treasures from the Vault: Welcome to Alfred Schmela’s Art Gallery!

Me with documents from the Galerie Schmela archive in the Special Collections Reading Room at the Research Library, Getty Research Institute

An important archive on postwar art is now available for research at the Getty Research Institute. After several months of writing and archival processing, I’ve just finished my work on the archive of Galerie Schmela. The archive’s 172 boxes and 25 flat file… More»

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      It’s been 125 years since Van Gogh’s death, today we celebrate his life’s work.


      5 Ways to See Van Gogh’s Irises

      Through observations, visitor conversations, and some sneaky eavesdropping, we’ve compiled the top 5 ways people enjoy this painting.

      1. In a Crowd
        One of the most obvious ways that people see the painting is in a crowd. The gallery is almost always filled, and you might have to wait before you can get up close. The anticipation builds as you start in the back row, and slowly move until you are close enough to see the brushstrokes of Van Gogh’s thick paint.

      2. Online
        David from Colorado said that this was his first visit, but he had already seen the painting online. In addition to being available through the Getty’s Open Content program, the painting is often seen on social media. Just search #irises on Instagram for a taste of the painting’s popularity. 

      3. Alone
        If you arrive right at 10 a.m. when the museum opens, the quiet gallery provides a perfect backdrop to really examine the painting. Solitude and seclusion gives the gallery a sense of intimacy. 

      4. Multiple Times
        Repeat visits can give rise to multiple interpretations. Is it a melancholy or joyous painting? Expressive or depressive? 

      5. Internationally
        Visitors from all across the world viewed this famous Van Gogh. In just one hour you can hear multiple languages—French, Italian, Chinese, Korean, German, and more. Irises seems to rise above cultural boundaries—a Dutch painting inspired by Japanese ukiyo-e prints—to strike an emotional resonance amongst all viewers. 

      What is your favorite lens to view Van Gogh’s work through? 

      07/29/15

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