Getty Foundation, Getty Research Institute

Symposium on Latin American Art: Live Online This Weekend

Update—videos of this event have been archived here.

The three-day symposium Between Theory and Practice: Rethinking Latin American Art in the 21st Century is streaming live this weekend, from Friday March 11 through Sunday March 13.

We invite you to join us online or on-site at the Getty Center on Friday and the Museum of Latin American Art (MOLAA) on Saturday and Sunday for this event, which brings together an international group of scholars, curators, museum directors, and artists to discuss new approaches to the study and presentation of Latin American art in the 21st century. The schedule is available here.

Presentations and discussion focus on three key areas: the role of the museum in the collection, contextualization, and representation of Latin American art; the production of revisionist art histories through innovative research methodologies, new interpretative frameworks and archive-based scholarship; and experimental curatorial models ranging from historic to contemporary case studies for the interpretation and presentation of art from Latin America.

Videos will be archived following the symposium here.

<em>Mapa quemado/Burned Map</em>, Horacio Zabala (Argentinian, b. 1943), 1974, mixed media on printed map. Courtesy of the artist and Henrique Faria Fine Art, New York

Mapa quemado/Burned Map, Horacio Zabala (Argentinian, b. 1943), 1974, mixed media on printed map. Courtesy of the artist and Henrique Faria Fine Art, New York

“Between Theory and Practice: Rethinking Latin American Art in the 21st Century” was conceived by Cecilia Fajardo-Hill, chief curator at MOLAA, and organized by MOLAA in collaboration with the Getty Research Institute, and with funding support from the Getty Foundation. This is part one of a two-part symposium; part two takes place at the Museo de Arte de Lima, Peru on November 2, 3, and 4, 2011.

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      William Pope.L

      Tell us a bit about how and why you became an artist.

      I used to blame my being an artist on my grandmother, but that was my younger self looking for a scapegoat. At one point in undergrad, I had a moment, a crisis where I thought it was my job to save my family and the best way to that was to be a commercial artist—but I had to let go of that. Truth be told, being an artist is something I choose every day. Of course, maybe I choose art because I’m afraid of theater—too much memorizing and being in the moment and shit.

      A lot of your work deals with racial issues—perceptions of “blackness,” “whiteness,” the absurdity of racial prejudices, the violence of it. Why do you address race in your work? Do you think art can be an agent of change?

      I address race in my work ‘cause day-to-day in our country it addresses me. Yes, art can change the world but so can Disney—so there is that. I think the real question is not can art change the world, but can art be changed by the world? Would we allow this?

      Humor, with a touch of the absurd, seems to be an important component in your artistic practice. What role does humor play in your work?

      I like to use humor in my work ‘cause it answers/deals with questions in ways that are very unique. Humor answers questions with an immediacy and creates a productive amnesia of the moment in the receiver—but then the wave recedes, the world floods back in with its pain, confusions, and crush but the humor remains like a perfume or an echo or a kiss inside beneath one’s skin.

      More: Artist William Pope.L on Humor, Race, and God

      From top: Obi Sunt (Production Image from the making of Obi Sunt), 2015, William Pope.L. Courtesy of the Artist © Pope.L; Gans-Nelson fight, from the album ‘Incident to the Gans-Nelson fight’ (Page 40-3), Goldfield, NV, September 3, 1906, William Pope.L. Courtesy of Steve Turner and the Artist; Tour People, 2005, William Pope.L. Courtesy of the Artist © Pope.L; Failure Drawing #301, NYU/Napkin, Rocket Crash, William Pope.L. Courtesy of the Artist © Pope.L.


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