artists’ letters

Posted in Art, Art & Archives, Getty Research Institute, Scholarship

Letters by René Magritte Join Research Institute’s Collection

Photo of Rene Magritte painting Les Promenades d'Euclide, 1955
© 2013 C. Herscovici, London / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

The artist’s business dealings with gallerist Alexander Iolas are the focus of nine revealing letters from the 1950s and ’60s. More»

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Posted in Art, Art & Archives, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

Write the Opening Line to Vermeer’s “Lady in Blue”

Detail of woman's face and letter in Woman in Blue Reading a Letter / Vermeer
Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam. On loan from the City of Amsterdam (A. van der Hoop Bequest)

What do you imagine the first line of this letter might say? Share your ideas, and we’ll continue the story. More»

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Posted in Art, Art & Archives, Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute, Paintings

Treasures from the Vault: Sylvia Sleigh and Lawrence Alloway, Mutual Muses

The Turkish Bath / Sylvia Sleigh
© Estate of Sylvia Sleigh

Intimate relationships visualized: the work and love of Sylvia Sleigh and Lawrence Alloway. More»

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Posted in Art, Art & Archives, Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute

Treasures from the Vault: Artwork by Richard Tuttle Discovered in the Archive of Galerie Schmela

Detail of calligraphy in a letter from Richard Tuttle to Alfred Schmela, 1968

As I was recently working on the archive of  the German art dealer Alfred Schmela, I discovered an unusual  mailing  sent by American postminimalist artist Richard Tuttle. Addressed to Alfred Schmela and his wife Monika in Düsseldorf, Germany, it was… More»

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      Color for Healing

      This sanitorium (tuberculosis hospital) in Paimio, Finland, was designed by architect Alvar Aalto in the 1920s. Unlike many hospitals, it was full of bright colors—including welcoming yellow on the main stairs and calming green for ceilings above bedridden patients. Aalto even created special chairs to open the chest and speed healing.

      The building’s colors were mostly whitewashed later in the 20th century, but now—due to a grant from the Getty Foundation as part of its Keeping It Modern initiative—its colors are being reconstructed and the building preserved for the future.

      More of the story: Saving Alvar Aalto’s Paimio Sanitorium

      Pictured: Paimio Sanatorium, patients’ wing and solarium terraces. Photo: Maija Holma, Alvar Aalto Museum. A color model for Paimio Sanatorium interiors by decorative artist Eino Kauria. Photo: Maija Holma, Alvar Aalto Museum, 2016.Paimio chairs (Artek no 41) in the Paimio Sanatorium lecture room, 1930s. Photo: Gustaf Welin, Alvar Aalto Museum. Aino Aalto resting in a chair on the solarium terrace. Photo: Alvar Aalto, Alvar Aalto Museum, 1930s. Main stairs of Paimio Sanatorium. Photo: Maija Holma, Alvar Aalto Museum.

      04/30/16

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