Connecting Art Histories

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Foundation

Studying Art History with an Ethnographic Eye

Project participants discuss features of a Chinese Republican period painting at the National PalaceMuseum in Beijing. Painting: Chen Hengque (Chen Hengke, 1876-1923), Viewing Paintings, 1918. Hanging scroll, ink and colour on paper. 87.7 x 46.6 cm. Collection: Palace Museum, Beijing. Photo: Wu Fang
Project participants discuss features of a Chinese Republican period painting at the National PalaceMuseum in Beijing. Painting: Chen Hengque (Chen Hengke, 1876-1923), Viewing Paintings, 1918. Hanging scroll, ink and colour on paper. 87.7 x 46.6 cm. Collection: Palace Museum, Beijing. Photo: Wu Fang

The Getty Foundation connects a new generation of scholars from across China. More»

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Posted in Art, Art & Archives, Education, Getty Foundation, Philanthropy

Connecting the Art Historical Dots

Connecting Art Histories participants studying frescoes in the Casa Vasari palace in Florence, Italy. © J. Paul Getty Trust
Connecting Art Histories participants studying frescoes in the Casa Vasari palace in Florence, Italy.

A Getty Foundation initiative is expanding the frontiers of art history by bringing scholars together from around the globe. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Foundation, Philanthropy

It Takes a Village: Understanding Spanish American Colonial Art from the Ground Up

Serie Reyes y Profetas de Israe / Marcos Zapata

Art history is sometimes imagined as a discipline of solitary scholars, not unlike King Solomon as depicted in this Viceregal painting by Marcos Zapata: alone in a study, poring over texts, and waiting for the moment of inspiration (perhaps divine?)… More»

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      Clocking in at a giant 400 square feet, this tapestry, Triumph of Bacchus, teems with tiny details and hidden narratives.

      Here are just three:

      • At bottom center, Bacchus poses on the world’s largest wine fountain.
      • To the left, a sad, Eeyore-like donkey waits for satyrs and men to unload grapes from his back.
      • To the right, a rowdy monkey rides a camel that carries wooden barrels—presumably to be filled with wine.

      The tapestry is one of the highlights of the exhibition Woven Gold: Tapestries of Louis XIV. (L.A. folks: final weekend!)

      More on The Iris: A Tour of the Triumph of Bacchus

      Triumph of Bacchus (overall view and details), about 1560, design by Giovanni da Udine under the supervision of Raphael; woven at the workshop of Frans Geubels, Brussels. Wool, silk, and gilt metal-wrapped thread. Courtesy of Le Mobilier National. Image © Le Mobilier National. Photo by Lawrence Perquis

      04/29/16

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