digital humanities

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute

Grad Intern Diary: Nathaniel Deines

Nathaniel Deines in the Library at the Getty Research Institute

Pertinacia, scientia, spes. More»

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Posted in Getty Foundation, Publications

Grad Intern Diary: Steph Grimes

Steph4_blog

An intern’s year developing digital publications from the ground up. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute, Manuscripts and Books, Publications, Research

New Digital Publication Reveals the Workings of Art History

Pietro Mellini’s Inventory in Verse, 1681 - home page
The GRI’s first born-digital publication, Pietro Mellini’s Inventory in Verse, 1681

New born-digital book offers a new model for publishing in art history. More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Research

Beyond Borders: The Humanities in the Digital Age

Terms for marble in multiple languages, superimposed on a carved marble sculpture of Athena
Selected multilingual terms from the entry for marble in the Art & Architecture Thesaurus

The Web has revolutionized the way we study art and culture. More»

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Posted in Getty Research Institute, Manuscripts and Books, Photographs, Film, and Video, Research

100,000 Digitized Art History Materials from the Getty Research Institute Now Available in the Digital Public Library of America

Barnsdall Park / Julius Shulman
Barnsdall Park, Shulman Retrospective (Los Angeles, California), 1969, photographed by Julius Shulman. Print: Frank Taylor. The Getty Research Institute, 2004.R.10 (Job 4460)

There’s a new place to explore digital treasures from the vast collections of the Getty Research Institute. More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Research

Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names Released as Linked Open Data

Linked Open Data / Ellora Caves in India

Vast database of geographic places is now available for free download. More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Foundation, Research

Summer Camp for Art Historians

Photo: Frettie, CC By-SA 3.0

Three summer institutes convene art historians to push digital art history forward. More»

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Posted in Getty Research Institute, Research

New Report Visualizes Cultural History through “Big Data”

Birth to death migration in Europe, according to the Getty’s Union List of Artist Names, cumulated over all time to CE 2012. Blue dots indicate the births of notable individuals; red dots indicate deaths. © Maximilian Schich, 2014
Birth to death migration in Europe, according to the Getty’s Union List of Artist Names, cumulated over all time to CE 2012. Blue dots indicate the births of notable individuals; red dots indicate deaths. © Maximilian Schich, 2014

Using science to map art history. More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Research

Art & Architecture Thesaurus Now Available as Linked Open Data

Linked Open Data / Vincent van Gogh's Irises

A key reference database on art and architecture is now available for free download. More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Research

Beyond Digitization—New Possibilities in Digital Art History

Madonna, Saint Thomas Aquinas, and Saint Paul / Bernardo Daddi
Digital Daddis. In the Getty Center galleries with Madonna, Saint Thomas Aquinas, and Saint Paul, about 1330, Bernardo Daddi. Tempera and gold leaf on panel, 47 1/2 x 22 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 93.PB.16

Museums and libraries have digitized millions of works of art. Now what? More»

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      Corita said that ads and billboards were the carriers of man’s loves, hopes, and beliefs, and that she was restoring life to words by taking them back from advertising. For Corita, “the big G” wasn’t General Mills, it was God; the dots on the Wonder Bread wrapper weren’t a decorative element, they were hosts. But her work was not a commentary or criticism of mass-market commercialism, as some may read it today. Her work was about joy and, she said, giving people an idea of what harmony might look like.

      If she were alive today, I’m sure Corita would still be an advocate for social justice and creating work with a message. I’m sure she would be delighted to communicate with people all over the world through social media. For Corita, looking was a spiritual act and she would invite you to do that: just look.

      Corita Kent, An Artist Who Sees Holiness in Wonder Bread

      All images: Corita Art Center, Immaculate Heart Community, Los Angeles, CA. Photographs by Arthur Evans, courtesy of the Tang Museum at Skidmore College

      08/28/15

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