digital humanities

Posted in Getty Research Institute, Photographs, Film, and Video

Digitizing Photography Incunabula

Title page of Allen S. Heath: Photography: A new treatise, theoretical and practical…, New York 1855. At left, A Portrait of Sir Humphrey Davy. The First Experimenter in Photography, before 1855, by O. Sackersdorff
Title page of Allen S. Heath: Photography: A new treatise, theoretical and practical…, New York 1855. At left, A Portrait of Sir Humphrey Davy. The First Experimenter in Photography, before 1855, by O. Sackersdorff

Some of the world’s earliest photographically illustrated books are being digitized by the Getty Research Institute. More»

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Posted in Getty Research Institute, Publications, Scholarship

Prototyping a Digital Publication for Scholars

Prototype for the folio-and-transcription view of the Mellini manuscript
Prototype for the folio-and-transcription view of the Mellini manuscript

How do you design an entirely new breed of digital publication? Test, revise, test, revise… More»

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Posted in Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings, Publications, Scholarship

“Paper Museum” Goes Digital

Screen capture from Digital Montagny

A 19th-century sketchbook goes digital. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute

Grad Intern Diary: Nathaniel Deines

Nathaniel Deines in the Library at the Getty Research Institute

Pertinacia, scientia, spes. More»

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Posted in Getty Foundation, Publications

Grad Intern Diary: Steph Grimes

Steph4_blog

An intern’s year developing digital publications from the ground up. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute, Manuscripts and Books, Publications, Scholarship

New Digital Publication Reveals the Workings of Art History

Pietro Mellini’s Inventory in Verse, 1681 - home page
The GRI’s first born-digital publication, Pietro Mellini’s Inventory in Verse, 1681

New born-digital book offers a new model for publishing in art history. More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Scholarship

Beyond Borders: The Humanities in the Digital Age

Terms for marble in multiple languages, superimposed on a carved marble sculpture of Athena
Selected multilingual terms from the entry for marble in the Art & Architecture Thesaurus

The Web has revolutionized the way we study art and culture. More»

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Posted in Getty Research Institute, Manuscripts and Books, Photographs, Film, and Video, Scholarship

100,000 Digitized Art History Materials from the Getty Research Institute Now Available in the Digital Public Library of America

Barnsdall Park / Julius Shulman
Barnsdall Park, Shulman Retrospective (Los Angeles, California), 1969, photographed by Julius Shulman. Print: Frank Taylor. The Getty Research Institute, 2004.R.10 (Job 4460)

There’s a new place to explore digital treasures from the vast collections of the Getty Research Institute. More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Scholarship

Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names Released as Linked Open Data

Linked Open Data / Ellora Caves in India

Vast database of geographic places is now available for free download. More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Foundation, Scholarship

Summer Camp for Art Historians

Photo: Frettie, CC By-SA 3.0

Three summer institutes convene art historians to push digital art history forward. More»

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      A Chat with Photographer Tomoko Sawada

      A conversation about Japanese matchmaking traditions, self-portraiture, clothes, and identity.

      When did you start photographing yourself?
      I began making self-portraits when I was 19. It was an assignment for a photography class. I can’t even explain in Japanese why I liked them so much. It was instinctual. It’s as if I knew that this was going to be my style, that this is what I wanted to do. And I’m still doing it because I love the self-portrait, but I don’t know why. 

      What themes are you exploring in your work?
      I’m interested in the relationship between inside and outside. If you wear a sexy dress or if you wear kids clothes or casual clothes, people treat you differently. Even though you are you no matter what you wear. It’s that relationship that makes me think. 

      My new work is from when I was living in New York. When I was in New York, people didn’t think I was Japanese. Sometimes they thought I was Korean or Chines or Mongolian. Even Singaporean. It was funny, when I would go to the Japanese market, they would speak to me in English. When I went to the Korean market, they would speak to me in English again. I don’t seem to look Japanese outside of Japan. I was surprised because I think I look totally Japanese. It’s funny that people’s points of view are totally different.

      Could you talk a little about OMIAI, the series that represents a traditional Japanese matchmaking technique.
      OMIAI is a tradition that is somehow still working today. Usually, there is a matchmaker and photographs are exchanged before meeting. If both sides are interested, they can meet for lunch or dinner accompanied by their parents and steps for marriage proceed from there. In the old days, some people chose their marriage partner just through photographs, without even meeting each other. 

      When OMIAI was exhibited in Japan I saw people making various comments in from of the work. People would say things like, “she looks like a good cook; surely she would prepare delicious meals every day,” or “ this girl could be a perfect bride for my son,” or “I can tell she would not be a good housewife,” or “she’s such a graceful girl; she must be the daughter of a decent family.” Comments like that. 

      What was the process of making that work?
      I gained 10 pounds before I started taking the pictures, and in six months I lost forty pounds, because I wanted to look different in each photo. I wanted to change the way my legs looked. 

      Every weekend I went to the hair salon and put on a kimono. Then I went to the photo studio on the street in Japan. I would take a picture and then change my clothes to western dress. Then I would go to the studio again the next weekend. 

      Did you tell the photographer how you wanted it done?
      I told him I was an artist and wanted to make photographs with him. I told him to think that each weekend new girls would show up to make the OMIAI. I didn’t want him to think of me as the same girl who came every weekend. He understood the concept. 

      We had fun. While he was taking pictures, his wife would tell me how to lose weight. She gave me many tips.


      Tomoko Sawada’s work is on view at the Getty until February 21, 2016 in “The Younger Generation: Contemporary Japanese Photography”

      02/11/16

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