Posted in Behind the Scenes, Exhibitions and Installations, Photographs, Film, and Video

Windows into Paris

bis rue de Douai
19 Mai, 2013, bis rue de douai, Paris 9-e

Photographer Gail Albert-Halaban spent a year exploring apartment windows of Paris, peering from one building into another, capturing moments that created unexpected intimacy among strangers. More»

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Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings

Louis XIV’s Golden Dome

Facade of the Church of the Invalides / Pierre Lepautre after Jules Hardouin-Mansart
Facade of the Church of the Invalides, 1687, Pierre Lepautre after Jules Hardouin-Mansart. Etching and engraving from a bound volume of 14 prints (Bâtiments du roi, Paris, 1687). The Getty Research Institute, 1392-604

A rare print for the dome of the Invalides in Paris reflects Louis XIV’s ambitions to make Paris “a new European center of architectural magnificence.” More»

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Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

This Just In: Édouard Manet’s “Spring”

Spring (Jeanne Demarsy) / Manet
Spring (Jeanne Demarsy), 1881, Édouard Manet. Oil on canvas, 29 1/8 x 20 ¼ in. The J. Paul Getty Museum

For Manet, fashion and the femininity were metaphors for the skilled artifice of painting itself. More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Museum, Prints and Drawings

Why Is This Drawing in a Museum?

Abstract Lines / Degas
The mysterious drawing in question. Abstract Lines, about 1877, Edgar Degas. J. Paul Getty Museum.

A look inside a sketchbook by Degas reveals the story behind a unusual drawing. More»

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Posted in Art, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

No Beauty Contest: 18th-Century English Lord Curates Getty Museum Gallery

Neoclassical and Roman sculptures at the Getty Center, Gallery W101
A new installation in Gallery W101 at the Getty Center presents 18th-century Neoclassical sculptures alongside two Roman pieces with storied pasts

Two pieces brought out from storage complete the story of the Judgment of Paris in a new installation at the Getty Center. More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Photographs, Film, and Video

The Quotable Man Ray

Datebooks and photographs from the Man Ray materials acquired by the Research Institute

Man Ray’s black and white portraits are widely celebrated, but two recent acquisitions by the Getty Research Institute shift the focus back on the famous photographer, providing a revealing picture of the often private artist. The first acquisition, a compact… More»

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Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum

Harvard Historian Robert Darnton on Blogging, 18th-Century Style

Historian Robert Darnton. Copyright © 2010, Brian Smith, Boston

Opening this week at the Getty Center is Paris: Life & Luxury, which traces the refined activities that took place inside a luxurious Parisian town house of the mid-1700s. On the streets outside such a house, however, occurred one activity… More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

Beyond the First Impression: Rediscovering Monet in Paris

The Portal of Rouen Cathedral in Morning Light, Claude Monet, 1894
The Portal of Rouen Cathedral in Morning Light, Claude Monet, 1894

Though his name has become synonymous with the 19th century’s canonical movement of Impressionism, and though his masterpieces hang proudly in the halls of the world’s finest museums, Claude Monet has long been—for me—a confounding artist. He was one of… More»

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      The Queen Who Wasn’t

      Louis XIV clandestinely wed his mistress, Madame de Maintenon, at Versailles on October 9 or 10, 1683. The marriage was much gossiped about but never openly acknowledged. She was never queen.

      Madame de Maintenon had been the {judgy} governess to Louis XIV’s children by his previous mistress, Madame de Montespan. Louis gave these children moneyed titles—such as the comte de Toulouse, who ordered the tapestries shown here for his residence outside Paris.

      Louis’s secret marriage ushered in a period of religious fervor, in sharp contrast to the light-hearted character of his early reign. Madame de Maintenon was known for her Catholic piety, and founded a school for the education of impoverished noble girls at Saint-Cyr in 1686 that stayed in operation until 1793. This engraving of the Virgin and Child was dedicated to her by the king.

      Virgin and Child, late 1600s, Jean-Louis Roullet after Pierre Mignard; Johann Ulrich Stapf, engraver. The Getty Research Institute. Tapestries from the Emperor of China series. The J. Paul Getty Museum


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