rare books

Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Manuscripts and Books, Prints and Drawings

Dig In to the Art of Food at the Getty

Pastry Shop / Abraham Brosse
Pastry Shop, 1600, Abraham Brosse. Hand-colored etching and engraving, 26.9 x 34 cm. The Getty Research Institute, 2014.PR.63

Exhibitions and events are extra tasty this fall. More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute

A Beginner’s Guide to the Renaissance Book

Page in Liber amicorum
Page in Liber amicorum, 1602–12, Johann Heinrich Gruber. The Getty Research Institute, 870108. See full digitized book

A tour of the early printed page. More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Manuscripts and Books

Decoding the Medieval Volvelle

Volvelle Animation

It’s part timepiece, part floppy disk, and part crystal ball. More»

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Posted in Getty Research Institute, Manuscripts and Books, Photographs, Film, and Video, Scholarship

100,000 Digitized Art History Materials from the Getty Research Institute Now Available in the Digital Public Library of America

Barnsdall Park / Julius Shulman
Barnsdall Park, Shulman Retrospective (Los Angeles, California), 1969, photographed by Julius Shulman. Print: Frank Taylor. The Getty Research Institute, 2004.R.10 (Job 4460)

There’s a new place to explore digital treasures from the vast collections of the Getty Research Institute. More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute, Manuscripts and Books

When Spray Cans Meet Quill Pens

Work by Krush, featured on a wall curated by Axis at ESMoA’s “Scratch” exhibit 
Courtesy Getty Research Institute
Work by Krush, featured on a wall curated by Axis at ESMoA’s “Scratch” exhibit Courtesy Getty Research Institute

A new exhibition pairs rare books from the 15th to 18th centuries with a contemporary collaboration between Los Angeles graffiti artists. More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Manuscripts and Books, Scholarship

16th-Century Album Records Social Network of Europeans in Istanbul

Leaf 119 verso and 120 recto from Johann Joachim Prack von Asch’s liber amicorum (book of friends), 1587–1612. The Getty Research Institute, 2013.M.24
Leaf 119 verso and 120 recto from Johann Joachim Prack von Asch’s liber amicorum (book of friends), 1587–1612. The Getty Research Institute, 2013.M.24

Newly acquired “book of friends” provides insight into European contact with the Ottoman Empire. More»

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Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute, Voices

Getty Voices: Aztec Idols, Explorers, and Egyptomania

Bust of an Aztec Priestess / Jean Massard the Elder
Bust of an Aztec Priestess, Jean Massard the Elder. Lithograph in Alexander von Humboldt, Vues des Cordillères, et monumens des peuples indigènes de l'Amérique (Paris, 1813), plate 1. The Getty Research Institute, 85-B1535

How did one of the 19th century’s greatest scholars misidentify an Aztec sculpture as Egyptian? Simple: Egyptomania. More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Manuscripts and Books, Voices

Artists of the Getty Graffiti Black Book on Style, Street Art, and Special Books

Gorgs
Page by Gorgs from the artists' book L.A. Liber Amicorum

Hear from prominent graffiti artists who helped shape a 143-artist collaboration representing L.A. street art. More»

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Posted in Art, Manuscripts and Books, Scholarship, Voices

The Getty Graffiti Black Book

LALiberAmicorum_earlymeeting
One of the first looks at some of the pages for the Getty Graffiti Black Book. We examined a few of our special collections volumes to compare illustrations.

A cross-century, cross-community collaboration between L.A. graffiti and tattoo artists—in the tradition of Albrecht Dürer. More»

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Posted in Art, Gardens and Architecture, Manuscripts and Books, Voices

Getty Voices: Renaissance Gardens

bourdichon_featured

A journey through Renaissance gardens and their paradoxes: natural and artificial, sin and salvation, virtue and vice. More»

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      A Chat with Photographer Tomoko Sawada

      A conversation about Japanese matchmaking traditions, self-portraiture, clothes, and identity.

      When did you start photographing yourself?
      I began making self-portraits when I was 19. It was an assignment for a photography class. I can’t even explain in Japanese why I liked them so much. It was instinctual. It’s as if I knew that this was going to be my style, that this is what I wanted to do. And I’m still doing it because I love the self-portrait, but I don’t know why. 

      What themes are you exploring in your work?
      I’m interested in the relationship between inside and outside. If you wear a sexy dress or if you wear kids clothes or casual clothes, people treat you differently. Even though you are you no matter what you wear. It’s that relationship that makes me think. 

      My new work is from when I was living in New York. When I was in New York, people didn’t think I was Japanese. Sometimes they thought I was Korean or Chines or Mongolian. Even Singaporean. It was funny, when I would go to the Japanese market, they would speak to me in English. When I went to the Korean market, they would speak to me in English again. I don’t seem to look Japanese outside of Japan. I was surprised because I think I look totally Japanese. It’s funny that people’s points of view are totally different.

      Could you talk a little about OMIAI, the series that represents a traditional Japanese matchmaking technique.
      OMIAI is a tradition that is somehow still working today. Usually, there is a matchmaker and photographs are exchanged before meeting. If both sides are interested, they can meet for lunch or dinner accompanied by their parents and steps for marriage proceed from there. In the old days, some people chose their marriage partner just through photographs, without even meeting each other. 

      When OMIAI was exhibited in Japan I saw people making various comments in from of the work. People would say things like, “she looks like a good cook; surely she would prepare delicious meals every day,” or “ this girl could be a perfect bride for my son,” or “I can tell she would not be a good housewife,” or “she’s such a graceful girl; she must be the daughter of a decent family.” Comments like that. 

      What was the process of making that work?
      I gained 10 pounds before I started taking the pictures, and in six months I lost forty pounds, because I wanted to look different in each photo. I wanted to change the way my legs looked. 

      Every weekend I went to the hair salon and put on a kimono. Then I went to the photo studio on the street in Japan. I would take a picture and then change my clothes to western dress. Then I would go to the studio again the next weekend. 

      Did you tell the photographer how you wanted it done?
      I told him I was an artist and wanted to make photographs with him. I told him to think that each weekend new girls would show up to make the OMIAI. I didn’t want him to think of me as the same girl who came every weekend. He understood the concept. 

      We had fun. While he was taking pictures, his wife would tell me how to lose weight. She gave me many tips.


      Tomoko Sawada’s work is on view at the Getty until February 21, 2016 in “The Younger Generation: Contemporary Japanese Photography”

      02/11/16

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