vases

Posted in Ancient World, Antiquities, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Villa

Three Ways to Avoid the Freeways: Transport Advice from Apulian Vases

Funerary Vessel with Phrixos on the Ram, 340–310 B.C., Attributed to the Phrixos Group. Created in Ceglie del Campo, Italy, Apulia. Terracotta, 18 1/2 in. diam. Antikensammlung, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin. © Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Antikensammlung. Photo: Johannes Laurentius
Antikensammlung, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin. © Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Antikensammlung. Photo: Johannes Laurentius

Sick of driving? Hitch a ride on these mythical creatures. More»

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Posted in Ancient World, Antiquities, Art, Getty Villa

A Winged Chariot, Wilshire Boulevard, and a Shipwreck: The Travels of Triptolemos

Display case at the Getty Villa featuring Red-Figure Neck-Amphora with Triptolemos Attended by Demeter and Persephone
Display case at the Getty Villa featuring, at center, Red-Figure Neck-Amphora with Triptolemos Attended by Demeter and Persephone, about 440–430 B.C., attributed to the Hector Painter. Greek, made in Attica. Terracotta, 19 1/4 in. high. The Los Angeles County Museum of Art, William Randolph Hearst Collection (50.8.23)

Retracing the travels of a beautiful Greek vase, from Naples to England to Los Angeles by way of a near miss with the sea floor More»

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Posted in Education, J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

A Strange and Wonderful Vase at Family Art Lab

Vase - detail of cast-bronze snails / Jean-Desire Ringel d’Illzach

This summer I’ve been helping to facilitate Family Art Lab, a weekend program at the Getty Center that combines a gallery exploration with hands-on art making in the Museum Courtyard. Through September 2, we’re offering a two-part experience centered around… More»

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      JAMES WELLING

      Artists in Light, Paper, Process connect to the history of photography in a tangible way. All seven of the artists in the show work with repetition, seeking to uncover how a similar technique or gesture can lead to unexpected results.

      For his sinuous Water series, James Welling plunged sheets of photographic paper into a basin, achieving through this simple act a remarkable variety of shapes, tones, and colors. “It’s the same gesture again and again, with each result different,” explained our photographs curator. “It’s not about achieving the perfect image one time only, but about mastering the gesture and seeing its diverse realizations.”


      Water, 2009, James Welling, chromogenic print. Courtesy of the artist and Regen Projects, Los Angeles. © James Welling

      07/30/15

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