Monthly Archives: July 2014

Posted in Antiquities, Art, J. Paul Getty Museum

3D Scanning Meets Ancient Art

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Ancient art is the subject of a 3D scanning pilot at the Getty Museum. More»

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Posted in Getty Research Institute, Research

New Report Visualizes Cultural History through “Big Data”

Birth to death migration in Europe, according to the Getty’s Union List of Artist Names, cumulated over all time to CE 2012. Blue dots indicate the births of notable individuals; red dots indicate deaths. © Maximilian Schich, 2014
Birth to death migration in Europe, according to the Getty’s Union List of Artist Names, cumulated over all time to CE 2012. Blue dots indicate the births of notable individuals; red dots indicate deaths. © Maximilian Schich, 2014

Using science to map art history. More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Villa

Byzantine Los Angeles

Saint Sophia Cathedral, anchor of Los Angeles's Greek Orthodox community and the Byzantine-Latino Quarter
Saint Sophia Cathedral, anchor of Los Angeles's Greek Orthodox community and the Byzantine-Latino Quarter

A visit to the heart of L.A.’s Greek Orthodox community. More»

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Posted in Art, Education, J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books

A Better World through Chivalry

A boy is never too young to practice being a gentleman.
 
Initial T: The Apostles; Boys Playing a Game, about 1320-25, in Breviary. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. Ludwig IX 2, fols. 356v–357.
A boy is never too young to practice being a gentleman. Initial T: The Apostles; Boys Playing a Game, about 1320-25, in Breviary. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. Ludwig IX 2, fols. 356v–357.

Chivalry gets a 21st-century, multi-generational spin through these artists’ workshops. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Center

Fashion Off the 405

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What are our visitors wearing to stay cool this summer? More»

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Posted in Art, Education

What Mask Do You Wear?

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What is the Mobile Arts Platform and why should you tell us what mask you wear? More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Prints and Drawings

This Just In: Three Drawings from the Dutch Golden Age

A Hollyhock, 1682, Herman Saftleven (Dutch, 1609-1685). Watercolor, gouache and black chalk, 35.2 x 25.2 cm. © Christie's Images Limited (2014)
A Hollyhock, 1682, Herman Saftleven (Dutch, 1609-1685). Watercolor, gouache and black chalk, 35.2 x 25.2 cm. © Christie's Images Limited (2014)

A peasant portrait, botanical watercolor, and winter scene join the Getty Museum’s collection More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute

Art Historical Books Bound for Brazil

University of São Paulo by Rafael Vianna Croffi on Flickr, CC BY 2.0.
University of São Paulo by Rafael Vianna Croffi on Flickr, CC BY 2.0.

179 boxes of books and journals are headed from Los Angeles to the Universidade Federal de Saõ Paolo. More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Art

Planning for Utopia

August 9, 1974 (Washington, D.C.)
August 9, 1974 (Washington, D.C.)

Photographs and Memories Reveal the Darker Side of a Symbol of Postwar Suburban Order. More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Villa

Searching for Murmurs of History

Caption: Elana Mann, Villa Murmurs study, 2014: Photo: Jean-Paul Leonard, courtesy of the artist
Caption: Elana Mann, Villa Murmurs study, 2014: Photo: Jean-Paul Leonard, courtesy of the artist

What does history sound like? More»

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      All Hail Tiberius, Least Media-Savvy of the Roman Emperors

      Tiberius was proclaimed Roman emperor on September 17 in AD 14, exactly 2,000 years ago.

      He was also a bit wacko. “He was the least media-savvy emperor you could imagine,” says curator David Saunders, who has been in charge of this bronze portrait of Tiberius which leaves us on September 22. He point to this description found in the writings of Cassius Dio:

      Tiberius was a patrician of good education, but he had a most peculiar nature. He never let what he desired appear in his conversation, and what he said he wanted he usually did not desire at all. On the contrary, his words indicated the exact opposite of his real purpose; he denied all interest in what he longed for, and urged the claims of what he hated. He would exhibit anger over matters that were far from arousing his wrath, and make a show of affability where he was most vexed…In short, he thought it bad policy for the sovereign to reveal his thoughts; this was often the cause, he said, of great failures, whereas by the opposite course, far more and greater successes were attained.

      Moreover, David tells us, “Tiberius’s accession itself was a farrago: Tiberius sort-of feigning reluctance, the Senate bullying him, he being all, ‘Well, if-I-have-to,’ and in the end—according to Suetonius—saying he’ll do it as long as he can retire.”

      Suetonius is full of great, albeit spurious, anecdotes about poor old Tiberius, David reports. “When someone addressed him as ‘My Lord,’ it is said, Tiberius gave warning that no such insult should ever again be thrown at him.”

      Happy accession, My Lord!

      Portrait Head of Tiberius (“The Lansdowne Tiberius”), early 1st century A.D., Roman. The J. Paul Getty Museum

      Statue of Tiberius (detail), Roman, A.D. 37, Soprintendenza Speciale per i Beni Archeologici di Napoli e Pompei – Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli, Laboratorio di Conservazione e Restauro. Currently on view at the Getty Villa following conservation and study.

      09/17/14

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